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  1. #53
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    Jul 2013
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    Illinois
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    You know, after reading all the above stress, risks and worry time, makes me wonder why we choose this trade anyway.

  2. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Austell, Ga.
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    1,307
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    Quote Originally Posted by triggerhappy View Post
    I do not beleive that I have ever seen a open drive Trane Centravac.
    The largest "Open Drive Centravacs" I have worked on were (6) Model # (OCV) were the original chillers installed @ Disney World in Orlando. Driven by GE-J47 jet engines with flexible shaft from the engines gearbox to the compressor. With only one set of vanes on the first stage, they would only unload to 40% of rated tonnage. Most failed within first year due to wear at tube supports in the evaporator. I do remember a VERY heated discussion with Tranes chief design engineer (Andy M.) as he assured to All present (Loudly) that Tranes tubes were rolled (expanded) at the supports and wear at the support could not happen...I snatched out a half a dozen tubes and requested an apology or a copper suppository was about to be administered. I never received an apology and as calmness set in, I forgot about the suppository statement.
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  3. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    3,534
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    The bench racing is usually over once Richard joins in...

  4. #56
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Austell, Ga.
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nuclrchiller View Post
    The bench racing is usually over once Richard joins in...
    I'm sorry Billy.....Even tho' I am retired (Fully) I still enjoy reading the wise posts here put up by those far more adept now than I ever was.
    Guys such as yourself that are willing to share their knowledge truly fascinate me to the fullest. My hat is off to each and every one that posts here for making this Ol' poots day a little brighter. My "Brothers-in Arms" make me very proud of our chosen profession.
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  5. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Prattville, Alabama
    Posts
    3,534
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardL View Post
    I'm sorry Billy.....Even tho' I am retired (Fully) I still enjoy reading the wise posts here put up by those far more adept now than I ever was.
    Guys such as yourself that are willing to share their knowledge truly fascinate me to the fullest. My hat is off to each and every one that posts here for making this Ol' poots day a little brighter. My "Brothers-in Arms" make me very proud of our chosen profession.
    My last post was meant entirely in friendly jest, so no apology needed Richard. And I feel the same way about this site. Your posts are among those I look forward to reading. They are not only informative, but your writing style puts a smile on my face.

  6. #58
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    435
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nuclrchiller View Post
    The bench racing is usually over once Richard joins in...
    Awwww.... and we were having so much fun.

    Maybe now we can see who has the biggest.......

  7. #59
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Central Texas
    Posts
    727
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nuclrchiller View Post
    My last post was meant entirely in friendly jest, so no apology needed Richard. And I feel the same way about this site. Your posts are among those I look forward to reading. They are not only informative, but your writing style puts a smile on my face.
    Agreed!
    Sic Semper Tyrannis.

  8. #60
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    29
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    Quote Originally Posted by humbled daily View Post
    You know, after reading all the above stress, risks and worry time, makes me wonder why we choose this trade anyway.
    agreed..i ask myself this almost every day...i've done 20+ teardowns. never scrambled one but i did have an impeller rub on my very first one as lead tech. i didn't center a diffuser plate and was too green to check the radial on the impeller going back together. spun great by hand, but at start up when the shaft lifted.. a sound that wakes me from a dead sleep to this day. i was lucky and damage was minor but i did have to go back in. as far as the "pucker" factor...i'm puckering just typing about it..if you're not nervous when you push the button, then you have no soul

  9. #61
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Austell, Ga.
    Posts
    1,307
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    Quote Originally Posted by humbled daily View Post
    You know, after reading all the above stress, risks and worry time, makes me wonder why we choose this trade anyway.
    The only time I ever questioned getting into this trade was the one day I met "The Little Blue Man" in the basement equipment room of the American Securities Bank in downtown New Orleans. We had three crews of mechanics working at Loyola University, The Superdome as well as Tulane University.
    Work was laid out at the three job-sites and I stopped by the bank later that afternoon. On entering the bank one is impressed by the 12 ft high doors of polished brass and ornate glassworks, albeit several patches could be seen if on looked closely enough. An armed guard is stationed in the lobby entrance and I was directed "Downstairs" at least 20' to the equipment room where the Chief Engr. was waiting for me. The chiller was a Carrier compressor model 9 1/2 CZ built in 1928 (4 years before Freon was invented) and used Methylene-Cloride as refrigerant. Nasty-Nasty stuff and boils almost at water pressures as the condenser runs in a 22' vacuum.
    The Engineer told me where the chiller was and would not leave his office to direct me that "Late" in the day. As I left his office carrying my load of parts etc. he informed that the "Little Blue Man" would probably be there at any time.....I said cool...
    I found the Chiller and started doing my thing sitting astraddle the drive end taking the coupling apart, I saw a figure of a man walk behind a nearby column, I calmly said "How's it going" out loud to whomever...whatever it was....No response....I picked up my 12' crescent, thumbed the jaws closed for a more formidable weapon and slid off the compressor. No one in the room but me.. I went (Quickly) back to the Engineer's office and asked who was that little guy that...was in the room with me. There is but one way to the equipment room and I saw no one leave.. The Chief said "Ohh...That's the Little Blue man. He comes and goes as he pleases this late in the day" ... "And by the way.... He's a ghost"...Exit....Stage Left in my new rental Thunderbird!! I invited all the other guys to join me there the next evening (with pay)...to visit. The patches on the entrance doors, although very well done, were explained to us that is where guard(s) emptied their Browning Hi-Powers trying to stop the blue man. Only two other mechanics had the... will to meet me the next day... The both left within 5 minutes of being there. I finished the job during daylight "Only" and I understand that the Old Carriers have been replaced with Mcquay chillers. Several guards have just left their emptied Brownings, guard belts and badges after seeing.... something.
    Now keep in mind that except for a beer or two I do not drink or do drugs and since my encounter I have met a few other mechanic that have worked there and admit to seeing...... something.
    Ain't "None" of us as smart as "All" of us..

  10. #62
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    33
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    You have to love it though. It's kind of like performing surgery. You have half your truck laid out in the mechanical room like a surgeon's table. Planning your rigging is like a preoperative. When all is ready you open her up and go to work, paying attention to every detail. We have guys who like to fly through them but I enjoy taking a little more time and being thorough. It makes it much easier to push that button when you know everything was done the best you could possibly do it. And when it starts up and purrs like a kitten, that's a great feeling. Going back 6 months or a year later and it's tight as can be. I would imagine a surgeon gets the same satisfaction stitching someone up and seeing them walk out of the hospital. I know it is a whole different level, but we do wash our hands as often.

  11. #63
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    124
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    Do we get to count absorber overhauls in the total number? that would get me in the 150-200 overhauls range. not a failure yet.
    Last year, 7- absorbers,1- 19EA,1- CVHE500,1-bearing insp.on 5500t 17DA86,1- 19DR,2- 19DKs.
    Way past the point of enjoying the work, I do enjoy showing others how to do it though.
    To the OP, the CVHE itself is not that hard, but make sure you have the tools first, mainly the rigging needed and the bearing tool to properly seat the back bearings.

  12. #64
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Posts
    6
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    Nothing is better than the feeling you get after transition and no weird noise.

  13. #65
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    kc mo
    Posts
    74
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    As everyone has said seems stressful. But the reward in the end seems to offset it. Really would like to learn chillers and do overhauls. Got a lot to learn first though lol

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