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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Electric heated home in Canada

    Hi,
    I was considering purchasing a nicely renovated old (1918) bungalow here in Calgary. The previous owner completely gutted it, new electrical and plumbing, new windows and doors, and insulated with spray foam. They also installed electric baseboard heat in every room.

    Most houses I see here are either natural gas boiler or natural gas furnace, so it was a surprise to see electric. Is electric a bad idea when it can go below -30 F for weeks at a time? Would it be uncomfortable or unaffordable in the winter? Keep in mind it is very small (760 sf on the main level, and the same in the fully developed basement) and has new insulation.

    Also how does fresh air get into the house? Would I need to crack a window now and again?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    PA
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    Whats your electric/hydro rate?

    You should look to see if it has an ERV or HRV installed in it.
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  3. #3
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    May 2012
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    Thread Starter
    Hi beenthere,
    The rate is $0.08/kWh.

    Where would the ERV/HRV be commonly installed? I'm not sure where to look.

    And if there isn't one, where is the right place to install it? Basement utility room, and I would need a louvered door for that room? (I'm a complete newbie with this stuff)

    Thanks

  4. #4
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    Jan 2004
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    Your electric rate is fairly cheap. So electric baseboard shouldn't cost too much to use. About $24.00 per 1,000,000 BTUs of delivered heat. You'll have to check to see what gas would cost you for the same amount of heat, to see which is cheaper.

    ERV/HRV would be installed in some area that a duct could be ran. It would be a rectangular box with a couple ducts connected to it. Many are connected to the bathroom exhaust.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Toronto
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    Where you are, I would go with gas. Yes, it is a reasonable rate for power but gas will be 30% of the electric to run. A heat pump could be 25% of electric to run. You have to decide if you want forced air or hot water heating. I'm a hot water guy so that is my bias.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Toronto Canada
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    Go with gas every house I have swapped over have been so happy they did.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
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    Western PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by #1CDNTECH View Post
    Go with gas every house I have swapped over have been so happy they did.
    #1CDNTECH

    Please check your PMs.

    Thanks.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    SW FL
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    Hmm Your heating bill depend on YOUR info

    Quote Originally Posted by 23skidoo View Post
    Hi,
    I was considering purchasing a nicely renovated old (1918) bungalow here in Calgary. The previous owner completely gutted it, new electrical and plumbing, new windows and doors, and insulated with spray foam. They also installed electric baseboard heat in every room.

    Is electric a bad idea when it can go below -30 F for weeks at a time? Would it be uncomfortable or unaffordable in the winter? Keep in mind it is very small (760 sf on the main level, and the same in the fully developed basement) and has new insulation.

    Thanks!
    What amount of insulation ?
    > R-14 walls
    > R-40 ceiling

    Less than 90 TOTAL square feet of window, U = 0.3 ?
    Basement totally underground

    I suspect < 22,000 BTU/hr & the number of Heating Degree Days in Calgary must > 8,000. Provide some insulation info, U value and area of glass, and I give reasonable estimate of heating cost based on $0.08 /kW and 8,500 cooling degree days.

    I'll post annual heating cost based on above as a first Guess.
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    SW FL
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    Month starting HDD
    5/1/2011 487
    6/1/2011 296
    7/1/2011 156
    8/1/2011 182
    9/1/2011 283
    10/1/2011 683
    11/1/2011 1098
    12/1/2011 1069
    1/1/2012 1302
    2/1/2012 1182
    3/1/2012 985
    4/1/2012 727

    8450
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    SW FL
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    44 M BTU /year = $1,020. annual heating cost.

    Floor Area 800 square feet
    Walls R-14 Area 1,000 square feet
    Ceiling R-40
    Windows R 3 Area 90 square feet
    HDD 8,500
    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    AT $.08/kWh for electricity, I'd recommend a Carrier Greenspeed/Bryant Extreme heat pump. It will provide both heating and cooling, has a variable output that adjusts to the variable outdoor temperatures and will provide AC in the summer, again with variable output. For the extreme winter weather, you can, if desired, install a high efficiency gas furnace that will have the capacity (in Btu's) to handle the job or rely on the HP to bring down the annual costs and use the resistance heat for aux Btu's in the coldest weather.
    If YOU want change, YOU have to first change.

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