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Thread: blower wheels

  1. #14
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    Sheet metal and a pair of snips ....... You could probably cut your own scraper out.

    In a residential setting.....Id just take it outside and scrape what I could and let a water hose and maybe some mean green or other heavy cleaner do the rest.
    The bible is my constitution and the constitution is my bible.

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  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvac wiz 79 View Post
    majority of my calls are on a roof so I'm S.O.L. lol ...
    I do a lot of rtu too, but when its 0°F out, they just get the heat back on, no cleaning! Unless it happens to be the cause of the call.
    Worry is a really gross misuse of one's imagination. -- PHM

  3. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckcrj View Post
    I do a lot of rtu too, but when its 0°F out, they just get the heat back on, no cleaning! Unless it happens to be the cause of the call.
    oh I'm with you there man. this winter was so fair which is probably why I'm thinking lightly about it. anything under freezing I'm quoting it for a warmer day if it's not the cause

  4. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by hvac wiz 79 View Post
    oh I'm with you there man. this winter was so fair which is probably why I'm thinking lightly about it. anything under freezing I'm quoting it for a warmer day if it's not the cause
    We generally do all rtu maintenance in Sept before it gets cold. As for the ones that don't like to do maintenance, it just costs them more when it breaks.
    Worry is a really gross misuse of one's imagination. -- PHM

  5. #18
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    Jan 2007
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    Cheap stiff bristle paint brush... Have used for years and works well. About a dollar or so at Lowes. I keep several on the truck. They usually last for about 15 - 20 good blower cleanings

  6. #19
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    Mar 2010
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    Arnold, Mo
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    Johnstone sells a blue plastic handled wire brush. It has a large wire brush on one end and a smaller wire brush on the other end. I use it for blower wheels, flame sensors, etc. Works great! However, I don't ever clean blower wheels good enough to eat off of.

  7. #20
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    Mar 2008
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    As I have been doing a lot of PM work at apartment buildings, I purchased 2 sizes of what look like bottle brushes, one 1/2 the other 3/4" from Granger, I then brush them from the side and it removes the dirt pretty well, vacuum them off and they are all set to go. I will try and find the numbers if anyone is interested in getting them for themselves.
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  8. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    brush

    I am new in service, mostly commercial, RTUs. I have found a good brush for cleaning many different things. I use a wall paper smoothing brush, the bristles are soft enough I can even brush coils with out damaging the fins. I also brush off the interior walls where dirt collects, such as RA plenum, SA plenum, compressors, burners and more. The brush is almost a foot wide and lasts me for a month or so. They cost around 2.50 at ACE Hardware.

  9. #22
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    Aug 2004
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    Missouri
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    I use the same approach as sparky05, I use a black nylon tube or bottle brush, mark the squirrel cage tine with a Sharpie, and start cleaning until I come back around to the mark, being careful not to dislodge the balancing weights. Take a small portable 1 gallon vac and clean out the loose debris and then give the wheel a good spin to remove remaining loose debris before reinstalling blowers. Works really well, and doesn't take that long to do.

  10. #23
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    Mar 2007
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    Many of my calls are in BFE with no water spigot. When I have water thats what I use when I dont I use my refrigerator condenser brush. Works well but not as good as plain old water.

  11. #24
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    Feb 2004
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    On large commercial contracts of multiple identical units (or same model residentials such as cono's or townhouses with furnaces), I have a spare blower wheel for each particular unit ready to switch out. Then in the comfort of my shop, I (or better yet an apprentice) clean the wheel in the following manner:
    1) Blow off assembly with nitro/CO2.
    2) Clean thoroughly with chemical/ water with denture type toothbrush. Fits like it was made for it.
    As jpsmith1cms says, go easy so you don't knock off the balancing weights close to the outer edges of the wheel.
    3) When and only if PERFECTLY CLEAN, spray blower wheel and housing, NOT motor, with dry teflon spray.

    Then on the next maintenance the small amount of dust film can easily be blown off with nitro or hp air/co2..
    Works best on new oilfree blowers but if you clean old one properly, saves you a ton of work plus you have an emergency spare on hand.
    If you spend an hour cleaning one and you charge $x/hr, a new one may pay for itself in a couple visits...depends on who is benefitting from this-your bottom line or customer or both.

  12. #25
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  13. #26
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    Feb 2004
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    As a footnote I came up with this idea from a friend who used to work on photocopiers. He would spray the glass for the document scanner with silicone spray and polish it so the paper would slide smoothly across without causing a paper jam.
    When I managed an apartment building I would polish the hard to reach windows with car wax and this would keep them virtually dustfree. A quick swipe with a towel over the end of a long broom would have them perfect in under a minute. Anyways, I tried a few other things before finding dry teflon spray as the best. It goes on wet and dries without affecting the balance or causing other problems. I do however let it dry completely before putting it back into service. No odor complaints or dirt sticking to it etc.

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