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  1. #1
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    Are vents on condensation drain lines required for proper condensate drainage?

  2. #2
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    venting

    york,

    good design of condensate lines calls for a vacuum break (air gap) where the condensate discharges into the sewer system. to express another way, the condensate should not be hard piped into the dwv.

    no vent. per se, is required on the condensate line itself, unlike sanitary drains, which must be vented to prevent siphonage at the traps and possible collaspe of the sewer pipe due to possible negative pressures created when no vent is present.



    [Edited by re2ell on 05-07-2006 at 05:48 AM]

  3. #3
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    If the condensate conection at the unit is in a negative pressure and you are running the trap to a drain somewhere with pipe and it doesn't just come out of the trap and drain directly as in a rooftop aplication, than yes.

    If you have a unit with a negative pressure at the coil and you build a trap on the outlet as you should, than you would instal an air trap or t open to the atmosphere on the leaving side of the trap where it conected to the drain line.

    Without a t, you have no way for air to enter the line to allow the condensate to drain down the line. If you had a severe pitch on the drain line and it was big enough, you might be able to get by without having any problems because air would enter the line at the point that water exited the line. Otherwise under normal situations if you have a low spot or little pitch able to be achieved, without an opening to air at the leaving side of the trap, the trap is pointless. With the negative pressure at the unit even though there is a trap water will be held in the line causing it not to drain properly.

    Basically, whenever you have to run a drain line from a trap on a unit that runs in a negative, always instal a t open to the atmosphere on one side, conected to the trap on the other side and conected to your drain line on the other. If I pipe traps and drains from any unit positive or negative I always pipe it in that configuration and instal a union after the trap to allow it to be removed and cleaned if required. With a positive pressure drain outlet, drain piping becomes less critical because of the air pressure from the unit having the effect of pushing the water from the unit.

  4. #4
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    Thread Starter
    Thanks for clearing this up for me guys!

  5. #5
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    Double Post OOPS.

    [Edited by ga technician on 05-07-2006 at 10:07 PM]

  6. #6
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    I will at no time install a trap on a (heatpump/negative pressure) if the drain is more than 10 Feet long Horizontally or Vertically. If you are draining into a Condensate pump(the water in the Pump Basin provides a TRAP). Although, I would love it if Installers insist on Wasting there time and Pipe because I make lots of MOOLAA cutting these Useless Traps out.

    Ohh by the Way at no time in no circumstance shall a Condensate Line be Drained in any Sewage or Grey Water Line.
    PERIOD!

    Unless you Want to Die of Legions Airs Disease...

    [Edited by ga technician on 05-07-2006 at 10:09 PM]

  7. #7
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    Frown

    MY God, RE2ell you must of laid out of class the day they said don't Drain your Condensate Water into a RAW SEWAGE LINE!...Cause it will Kill somebody!!!!!!!!!
    The Bactirum can live in the air or water the trap isn't some inmaginary wall of water it only breaks a VACUUM of Air!!

    Moderator Please allow me to Slap this man its why our Industry is in Shammbles....


  8. #8
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    Originally posted by ga technician
    MY God, RE2ell you must of laid out of class the day they said don't Drain your Condensate Water into a RAW SEWAGE LINE!...Cause it will Kill somebody!!!!!!!!!
    The Bactirum can live in the air or water the trap isn't some inmaginary wall of water it only breaks a VACUUM of Air!!

    Moderator Please allow me to Slap this man its why our Industry is in Shammbles....

    Whether correct or incorrect, right or wrong, we are each entitled to our opinions. If you disagree with a posters idea, feel free to counter, but let's keep it civil.


  9. #9
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    GA take it easy and re-read his post. He said what you said in the fact that a line should never be hard piped into a drain directly. An air gap, example a condensate drain line over a floor drain or other drain is required. A condensate line can not be directly conected to a drain but ultimatly it has to drian into one.

  10. #10
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    I Apologize
    Thanks Evil I lost MY head a Friend of a Friend I had me in on a Consort and the Cause of Sickness was Legions Aires;
    I got a little off my Rocker!

    Please Accept My apologe,

    RE2ell

    Sincerely,
    Joshua Jones

  11. #11
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    man of character

    Originally posted by ga technician
    I Apologize
    Thanks Evil I lost MY head a Friend of a Friend I had me in on a Consort and the Cause of Sickness was Legions Aires;
    I got a little off my Rocker!

    Please Accept My apologe,

    RE2ell

    Sincerely,
    Joshua Jones
    Joshua,

    your a man of good character, apology fully accepted and appreciated, thank you

  12. #12
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    Feb 2006
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    I have a crawlspace. My HVAC contractor ran the condensate pump discharge line to drain in the center of the pad below the outdoor unit. Is this better for health reasons?

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