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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    NORTHERN
    Posts
    1,178
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Stoltem View Post
    Hi,

    Can you tell me ...
    Who did you find?
    Water Furnace/GeoStar; Climatemaster/Carrier (Bryant; Econaire, Hydro-Temp, Enertec/Hydron/GeoComfort;
    Hydro-Temp for HW and Heat Recovery and HVAC all in one...Pumps built inside and 4zoning board for 2 decades, built in;
    Fla Ht P, and many others

    see list at signature link to Eff E-Star OEM's all rated.
    Process cooling: NO COMPRESSORS Earth-Coupled since 1996
    ... however, much still needs to be hybridized energy transfer.

    CLOSED LOOP 2015 listed EER's
    even 49+ now; and "blended from low to high variable speeds" for 32deg.F ~ E-Star

    Perhaps you need a 32F Chiller/HW-Heat: buy a GEO-T Heat Pump (GHP with Heat-Recovery)
    http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?...mal_heat_pumps

    http://www.hydro-temp.com/products.html and Bosch/Carrier and AquasystemsInc.com

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Posts
    1
    Post Likes
    Did anyone ever comment back about geothermal in the more southern areas? I am in the San Antonio area and my engineer wife insists that geothermal is not worth it, especially if you have a super insulated house like we are building. She totally screwed us on the last house by not letting me build with geothermal resulting in a cold house in the Virginia winters and I want to get some "real" feedback on how geothermal works in the cooling areas as opposed to the heating areas up north.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Cedar Rapids, Iowa
    Posts
    126
    Post Likes
    Past results can be an indicator of future performance...

    The best way to know if Geo is "worth it" in San Antonio is to have local experienced Geo contractors bid the project.
    They should be able to show cost comparisons between Geo, A/C and Air Source Heat Pumps. We are in Iowa and Geo is not the best fit for every job here.

    Bergy

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    578
    Post Likes
    "engineer wife"

    Get the seasonal ground water and air temps and have the family engineer lay out the Mollier diagrams for whatever system you design and run that against local energy costs.

    Here in PNW we do not need AC unless one has no trees, and then only about 5 days in the summer.
    In San Antoine, doubt GSHP for heating would be any benefit at all. Here in PNW with 55F ground water in winter breakeven point for heating for air-air vs. GSHP is 42F, Probably similar where you are, maybe a little higher as ground water likely warmer.
    Own house has both GSHP and air-air, outdoor tstat switches to GSHP when air temp below 42F - yu may want to consider that type option if the engieer designing the system.

    ps: Recently installed single 2T minisplit in a small 1600 sq ft office, 1-1/2 years operation and owner reports very happy, was sufficient as building has 8" walls and super insulation. GSHP would have taken 200 years to break even, maybe never with oil/ng prices dropping.

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Kalamazoo, MI
    Posts
    4
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by loganms View Post
    Did anyone ever comment back about geothermal in the more southern areas? I am in the San Antonio area and my engineer wife insists that geothermal is not worth it, especially if you have a super insulated house like we are building. She totally screwed us on the last house by not letting me build with geothermal resulting in a cold house in the Virginia winters and I want to get some "real" feedback on how geothermal works in the cooling areas as opposed to the heating areas up north.
    If you're building a super-insulated home, the gap in savings between one system or another will become significantly less pronounced. Assuming you have plans for the building, it would be worthwhile to calculate the design heating and cooling load (load calc) and compare that with bin data or the number of hours you expect to use heating and cooling. From there, you can calculate the total cost per year to keep your home comfortable. The reality is that geothermal systems are most efficient when you're placing the same number of BTU's back into the ground as you took out yearly.

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