Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9

    Walk in cooler/freezer with bad insulation.

    Hi, so I live in Honduras (That's in Central America) on a small island. Where I work we have a walk in cooler and freezer. All of the insulation is water logged. There are no technicians around here that have any knowledge in this sort of thing... Is there any way I can fix this myself without spending a ton of money?

    Do I have any options besides basically building a whole new cooler/freezer with new insulated panels? Getting them here would be tough and expensive.

    I'm not sure what the specs of the compressors are and all that. (hopefully that's irrelevant for this issue)

    Thanks for any insight.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Asheville, N.C.
    Posts
    103
    Is the unit still working within specs? Have you tried a large dehumidfier?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    It's working, but there are wet spots on the floors and outside walls. It seems like they put the insulation between the building walls or something, not really sure what they did.

    I'm just trying to save some electricity because it's very expensive here, and keep the walls dry.

    I have not tried a dehumidifier, how would that work?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    I think the inside of the cooler and freezer are fiberglass.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Asheville, N.C.
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by VanW View Post
    It's working, but there are wet spots on the floors and outside walls. It seems like they put the insulation between the building walls or something, not really sure what they did.

    I'm just trying to save some electricity because it's very expensive here, and keep the walls dry.

    I have not tried a dehumidifier, how would that work?
    A dehumidifier pulls in ambiant saturated air from the surrounding space through an evaparater coil causeing the water to condensate, which is collected in a container or removed through a drain hose. the dryer air passes across the condensor coil which cools the compressor and allows dryer, hotter air back into the space. The dryer, hotter air picks up more saturated air and restarts the process.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeybow View Post
    A dehumidifier pulls in ambiant saturated air from the surrounding space through an evaparater coil causeing the water to condensate, which is collected in a container or removed through a drain hose. the dryer air passes across the condensor coil which cools the compressor and allows dryer, hotter air back into the space. The dryer, hotter air picks up more saturated air and restarts the process.
    So I would only need to put this in the same room as the compressor, or is it something that installs on/with the compressor? When you say dehumidifier, I'm think of what my grandparents had in their basement. I am probably way off base.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    burlington county n.j.
    Posts
    9,763
    what size are the boxes?

    is spray foam available down there?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    The kind in an aerosol can. I have never inquired about the big ones they use for houses, but I kind of doubt it.

    Something I was thinking about was that foam sheet type of insulation and then just build a second wall on the inside. Or tearing it out and then using that, but I don't know if that is good enough for this sort of thing. I haven't measured but I think they are like 8x8 cubes.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Asheville, N.C.
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by VanW View Post
    So I would only need to put this in the same room as the compressor, or is it something that installs on/with the compressor? When you say dehumidifier, I'm think of what my grandparents had in their basement. I am probably way off base.
    Put it in the same room that has the water. and yes, it might be just like the one your g-parents had. The newer ones are alot more efficeint and can remove 10 gals. or more of water in a 24 hr period depending on the size of the unit.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeybow View Post
    Put it in the same room that has the water. and yes, it might be just like the one your g-parents had. The newer ones are alot more efficeint and can remove 10 gals. or more of water in a 24 hr period depending on the size of the unit.
    I can't do that, plus I don't think it would work as the rooms that are getting wet are all open to the ocean.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Asheville, N.C.
    Posts
    103
    Quote Originally Posted by VanW View Post
    I can't do that, plus I don't think it would work as the rooms that are getting wet are all open to the ocean.
    Maybe thats why the're wet? Additional insulation probably the best solution.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    9
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeybow View Post
    Maybe thats why the're wet? Additional insulation probably the best solution.
    No, that's not why they are wet. It is inside, there is just a large area that's screened in.

    So what do you guys think about the foam sheet type insulation, would that work? Seems like it would be the simplest solution if it would work...

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,478
    I remember some of the old fiberglass insulated panels which were common about 50-60 years ago and many of those suffered a fate similar to what you have described. The insulation became saturated to the point where it was ineffective as an insulator, often falling down inside the wall panels from its own weight.

    The old fiberglass must be removed and if the remaining structure is sound it may be feasible to reinsulate them. The primary concern here...aside from the insulation itself...is the need for a proper vapor barrier on the outside of the insulation.

    A minimum of 4 mil polyethylene sheeting all around, tightly sealed will work but you may want to look into a more old-fashioned way of doing it using hot tar as a vapor sealer. Many years ago nearly all freezers and coolers were constructed of double layers of sheet cork sealed with hot tar. Here's a link to a book published in 1909 describing how it was done back then:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=W8w...uction&f=false

    Cork insulation is still available too:

    http://www.marylandcork.com/Insulation-Corkboard.aspx


    I would also suggest using a closed cell type urethane insulation which also would help inhibit moisture penetration.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event