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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    34
    Need a little help wading through the marketing and sales mumbo-jumbo. I am the new owner of a 1950's era house that seems to have quite leaky ductwork. It is all rigid metal and about 1/2 of it appears to have been newly insulated within the past several years. At the seams of insulation I can feel very faint wisps of airflow. Since I can only easily access some short runs of the ductwork, I am assuming my issue could be large scale considering the sprawling ducts! If it matters, the scale of the job is about 3000sqft served by a new 5-ton system.

    To make a long post short - I need a little feedback from you guys on what duct sealing methods are the most cost effective. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    The easist way to insure sealing is;

    http://www.aeroseal.com

    "Fix-A-Flat" for your ducts,seals from the inside out,no need to remove the insulation to seal the metal ducts.

    Sadly it may not be available in your area.Check the site to see.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    34
    I did read a little about Aeroseal while searching on this forum. Unfortunately, they do not operate in my area. Is that a patented process or may I find similar fix-a-flat operations? And would I need to have my ducts cleaned first?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    7,405
    For one, that stuff doesn't work. You mean to tell me that stuff is gonna plug every leak? C'mon. A house built in the 50's needs it's ductwork physically inspected (yes, you will have to go in the crawlspace). You could have ducts that are hanging by a thread, big gaps that this blow-in stuff won't get to. You need to get some duct mastic and brush the stuff on. Is it more work, yes. But isn't everything more work when it's done right?


    http://www.ductmate.com/products/proseal.asp

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Originally posted by seatonheating
    For one, that stuff doesn't work. You mean to tell me that stuff is gonna plug every leak? C'mon. A house built in the 50's needs it's ductwork physically inspected (yes, you will have to go in the crawlspace). You could have ducts that are hanging by a thread, big gaps that this blow-in stuff won't get to. You need to get some duct mastic and brush the stuff on. Is it more work, yes. But isn't everything more work when it's done right?


    http://www.ductmate.com/products/proseal.asp

    No, Aeroseal won't rehang the duct.LOL

    It will however seals gaps up to 5/8" by what ever length.

    It beats removing all the duct wrap,from that "great" better than ductboard and flex(LOL) job somebody did.

    In tests for the utility ,they have seen how Aeroseal does a better job than hand sealing.It gets to places you might not be able to reach.

    Plus at the end you have a ductblaste test to certify the actual cfms of leakage.

    I think in this case ,less work,equals a better job.now I didn't say it costs less.

    refinished ,Where are you located??

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    34
    Memphis, TN. I have been in the crawlspace a few times. Not my favorite room in the house! Anyway, the ducts are intact, hung correctly, and there are no obvious issues with the connections to the trunk or registers. The only issue seems to be leakage from joints and seams. I could go the mastic route, but holy cow, that seems like serious work and a waste of good insulation. And work = cost. I do want to do it right however and will pay to have it done if there are no good non-invasive routes.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    There's a franchise in Littlerock,how far is that?

    We do Aeroseal and have driven 3.5 to do a job.Have one customer ,with a condo,duct between floors,that considering have us go 5 hours to do Aeroseal.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    7,405
    5 hour drive? Ya, that stuff must be expensive to make it worth it, ha ha.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    The drive ,is we do it,really makes it expensive.

    I wish we had more meatl ducts systems in our area,because they seal in a third of the time as ductboard.

  10. #10
    [QUOTE][i]Originally posted by dash

    It will however seals gaps up to 5/8" by what ever length.


    Sealing 5/8" gaps is pretty good and the ductblaster test is good verification of how well the system is sealed.
    There's no doubt that aeroseal has some applications where it will help.



    It beats removing all the duct wrap,from that "great" better than ductboard and flex(LOL) job somebody did.

    Not sure why you need to take a sarcastic jab at a sheet metal install that was obviously done poorly and compare it to ductboard and flex. I mean, who really cares?
    A poor installation negates the good aspects of either material.



    In tests for the utility ,they have seen how Aeroseal does a better job than hand sealing.

    There's not a sealer made that can install and seal trunk and branch runouts better than an experienced and capable installer.




  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    New construction it's possible.


    With existings ,maybe ,but the cost would be higher to remove and replace insulation at every possible leak.

    How do you get to panned returns ,and duct in walls or inbetween floors?Aeroseal does with no problem.


    Disbelief is normal ,I had several demos or several years before going with it.

    Have you ever used the Aeroseal system??

  12. #12
    I have had 2 instances where I could inspect the aeroseal at completion. The results were fair, with several leaks still not sealed. I also noted that some of the original leakage was much smaller in dimension than the noted 5/8" gap the company states are routinely sealed. Airflow and velocity measured at each runout was improved and some runs were significantly improved.
    Again, I agree that it can be a useful tool to seal ducts within or below the parameters noted on their site.
    If I could gain access to soffits and remove underpinning to properly seal ducts, I believe I could seal them better than the product can, but that's a big if.
    I'm not opposed to using aeroseal as a last resort.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    7,405
    Helpers can reach anything..

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