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  1. #1
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    Apr 2006
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    Specs and Drawings

    Dont know if this is the right forum to ask. I am wondering how is the best way to learn how to read the drawings of the buildings that we do the work on? Is it just practice, or is there some kind of class that I could take to learn more?

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    Jan 2012
    Location
    south Texas
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    5
    Blue prints?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
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    Gulf Coast
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    Youtube has many videos to help you start out just do a search for reading blueprints.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by markinsa View Post
    Blue prints?
    Yea, Blue Prints, drawings? Dont even know the correct term!! LOL!!

    The owner is going to start taking me out and teaching me on how to bid out jobs and such. I have gotten blueprints before on public bids,(in which we never win) and I look at these prints and they look Greek to me! LOL!! Kinda like when I first started out in this field and could not read the schematics for a RTU unit.

    My boss said it just takes time, and alot of practice, so I would like to get a start on learning, but just dont know where to start.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
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    you need to find a drafting class, they will teach you how to interpret blueprints


    figure out the legend or schedule of the prints, life will get easier
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Fremont, Indiana
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    Had to take a basic blue print reading class back in trade school. Doubt I could manipulate my way through them anymore. Four credit hrs if I recall correctly.
    May be able to find something offered at a local community college. Good class, just wish I'd have used it fresh out of the course. Might have stuck better.
    Member of the "Work Exchange Program"
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by hudson73 View Post
    Yea, Blue Prints, drawings? Dont even know the correct term!! LOL!!

    The owner is going to start taking me out and teaching me on how to bid out jobs and such. I have gotten blueprints before on public bids,(in which we never win) and I look at these prints and they look Greek to me! LOL!! Kinda like when I first started out in this field and could not read the schematics for a RTU unit.

    My boss said it just takes time, and alot of practice, so I would like to get a start on learning, but just dont know where to start.
    I'd ask the boss for prints from previous jobs and start there.

    Find out what the boss wants you to bid on in the scope of work. Then, do a bid and compare notes.

    The specs, details and section views are where you will lose your ass if you aren't paying attention.

    On the bigger jobs, you gotta watch out for stuff like the sprinkler main in the same space as your ductwork... or the sprinkler heads in the same space as your diffusers.

    And the can lights. Oooh, the can lights. Tall electrical fixtures under or near the ductwork isn't fun, especially when the project is moving forward on construction drawings.

    And if the builder isn't paying for mechanical overlays... guess who gets to figure it out.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    144
    Quote Originally Posted by hudson73 View Post
    Yea, Blue Prints, drawings? Dont even know the correct term!! LOL!!

    The owner is going to start taking me out and teaching me on how to bid out jobs and such. I have gotten blueprints before on public bids,(in which we never win) and I look at these prints and they look Greek to me! LOL!! Kinda like when I first started out in this field and could not read the schematics for a RTU unit.

    My boss said it just takes time, and alot of practice, so I would like to get a start on learning, but just dont know where to start.
    Although I haven't had the opportunity to start bidding jobs, my boss exposed me to shop drawings for submission (after bidding). I don't know if your company does shop drawings, but that would also be great exposure opportunity, because you have to understand the whole system, which will tell you what your company must provide (after reading the mechanical spec). I found that sometimes there are discrepancies between the bid and the actual shop drawings, but more or less they are within reason. This is just what I thought - when I started, I thought i knew how to read them, but found out quickly that all I saw were a bunch of lines for the first few days. From cross referencing between the legend and the layout, I got the hang of it fairly quickly.

  9. #9
    ControlsInMT's Avatar
    ControlsInMT is offline Professional Member/ARP Committee
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    Use colored pencils to mark up the corresponding items. Also check off the notes as you find them to be sure you don't miss any. And the most important, READ and UNDERSTAND the spec's. There's some Engineers out there that hide a few "nasty" phrases in their spec's to cover their backsides.
    Don't worry zombies are looking for brains, you're safe...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    179
    Quote Originally Posted by ControlsInMT View Post
    Use colored pencils to mark up the corresponding items. Also check off the notes as you find them to be sure you don't miss any. And the most important, READ and UNDERSTAND the spec's. There's some Engineers out there that hide a few "nasty" phrases in their spec's to cover their backsides.
    Very, very accurate. You must know the specification book backwards and foreward. There are few things more satisifying than having an engineer reading through his own spec to find a "gotcha" when you know it's not there. Had an engineer from a huge firm tell me the ductwork in a food court had to be stainless, because the spec said any duct exhausting humid air had to be stainless. Argued the return was exhaust. I pointed out that the food court used all paper products. His reasoning : "they make coffee don't they". I asked him to pull out a psych chart and find out how many pots of coffee would have to be on to raise the RH 1%?

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