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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada Occupation:Interprovincial Plumber, Commercial Gasfitter Interests:
    Posts
    2,414
    I get to disagree with Noel.
    I love it.
    I was looking as Siggy's charts late last night and a 1" monoflow tee is equal to 23.5 feet.
    I'm betting on the pump.
    I love my job, but paydays Thursday

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,708
    Originally posted by rich pickering
    I get to disagree with Noel.
    I love it.
    I was looking as Siggy's charts late last night and a 1" monoflow tee is equal to 23.5 feet.
    I'm betting on the pump.
    Now leave him alone.. he cant help that he does not get out in the real world more often.

    I just disconnect a 1 1/4 monoflow system with 9 convector on it and it had a package circ on it.
    Ask them how was the heat and they claim it was fine untill
    it went to leaking.

    So I too wonder about the math sometimes.

    Speaking of the math lets say the package circ because of the head it was seeing reduce the flow but cause the temp drop to go from 20F to 40F..would it still heat the house?




    [Edited by simpleman on 03-15-2006 at 06:34 AM]

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,285

    I made a mistake.

    I'm sorry.

    I only looked up one brand, Taco. Each manufacturer publishes the value of a Monoflow T, so that the right pump can be selected.

    We agree that the loss through each T matters, though.

    I'll try harder, in the future.

    Noel

    [Edited by Noel Murdough on 03-15-2006 at 07:11 AM]

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,285

    Balance would be horrible.

    If you planned for 180° F water at a radiator or convector, and you actually have 140° F water at the last unit (40° F drop in temperature), you aren't heating that last room as much as you had planned to.

    You'll overheat the rooms at the beginning of the loop, to the point that you'll be tempted to REMOVE some of the radiation.

    THEN you'll see short cycling.

    Noel

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,708
    Thanks Noel..now that you put it that way it make sense.

    I went to one last night for a buddy of mine that has been out three time on a intermitted no heat call sometimes it
    work other times it did'nt.

    Four honeywell zone valves and one circ.

    Guess what I found?

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,285

    small pump?

    No math done about the flow rates in each zone?

    Long loops?

    Noel

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,708
    It was the end switch on the zone in question it would not make.

    Everytime he went there the other zone were calling.So he turn the stat on the zone valve open and turn it off and the zone valve closed.

    But being the other zone were calling and keeping the circ and boiler running he did not catch the bad end switch.






  8. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Location
    Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada Occupation:Interprovincial Plumber, Commercial Gasfitter Interests:
    Posts
    2,414
    Siggy's charts show a 1.25 flow check as 74 feet.

    The plot thickens.
    I love my job, but paydays Thursday

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    2,036
    Hydronics = Math Do the math.
    Figure the head. Figure the gallons of liquid in the system. Factor in how quickly you want all of that water to totally circulate through the system (GPM). Go to the pump curves of your favorite manufacturer and figure out what pump will do it.
    I wonder at what size the boiler manufactures quit putting 007's on the new boilers? When they can't get the correct flange combination to fit on the outlet piping anymore???
    Oh..... I think it's the pump that's the problem. Came with the boiler... has to be the right size, right?

  10. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    1,285

    We boiler manufacturers....

    put any pump on the boiler that the customer orders.

    We replace the boilers in our inventory as they get ordered and sold.

    It really doesn't matter to us WHICH pump the wholesaler and contractor orders.

    I wonder if "contractors shopping price" has any influence on which pump gets ordered by the wholesaler.

    The order has a place for the part number for the boiler/burner/pump combination that the customer requests. There are 10 standard circulator choices available. The 100 and 110 are still available, in fact.

    Why would we have a "favorite" circulator?

    Noel

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    205
    My vote on this goes with the circulator, if you vented and there is no more air then its a circulation problem.

    My thoughts would be with the 0011, more pump with enough head to compensate for the tees and the 1-1/4 run.

    BJD

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