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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    bedford ind
    Posts
    1,089

    Qwik system flush

    Tried using this product. Followed directions to a tee. Do not care for this product or any like it. Unless the lineset is straight and short, it is worthless. Can anyone who has used this type of product say, honestly, that it works without leaving residue. How does it flush out around multiple elbows and bellied-out linesets? Dos this do more damage than good?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    435
    I completely disagree with you on this but there are many people who would agree with you as well. When I have used it I will crimp the outlet side of my lineset so that I can build up pressure to move any debris and oil. Then with short burst I will add the R-11. Then purge it with nitrogen for 20-30 seconds. A little more R-11. Then a lot more nitrogen. And finish it off with a triple vac.
    You can find lots of post on this discussion if you use the search.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    3,031
    Quote Originally Posted by HuNGRYTeCH View Post
    I completely disagree with you on this but there are many people who would agree with you as well. When I have used it I will crimp the outlet side of my lineset so that I can build up pressure to move any debris and oil. Then with short burst I will add the R-11. Then purge it with nitrogen for 20-30 seconds. A little more R-11. Then a lot more nitrogen. And finish it off with a triple vac.
    You can find lots of post on this discussion if you use the search.
    Ditto, had a water cooled package unit with water breach in condenser. Ended up dumping about a gallon of water out of system. Did the R-11 Flush 2twice...(2 cans) Lots of nitro, and quadruple evac. Replaced FD, EXP valve and let it rip. Waited one week and replaced FD again. Runs like a beauty, dry as a bone. Only thing I wished I would have done also, is put a suc line fd for as much water as I had. Next time i guess.
    “If I have seen further than others, it is by standing upon the shoulders of giants.” ~ Sir Isaac Newton


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    bedford ind
    Posts
    1,089
    thanks for the reply.I have followed the instructions to the letter and still do not like the product. On linesets with elbows and bellies It burns off so fast it leaves residue.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    147
    I have used RX-11 flush many times on some really bad burnouts. With a suction line core dryer, new liquid line filter dryer and some of that acid away. Changed the suction line dryer core out the next day and tested for acid. Did the same procedure a week later. Pulled out the suction line core dryer 30 days later. Still running today, proper clean up of a burnout takes time, you can't rush it.
    I have done so much with so little for so long, that now I can do almost anything with nothing at all.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    720
    If you want something that really works and is not that expensive try one of these.

    http://hecat-inc.com/AC%20flushers.htm

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    44
    Just used it today to flush out stainless steel (non acr) lines (Rx11). I agree you have to have some kind of restriction on the back end to biuld up pressure. I also wonder how well it does on some of the bigger tubing 1 3/8+. The last post linked to some kind of flush gun. Any luck with these? The main problem with (Rx11) is the price.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    147
    Quote Originally Posted by western View Post
    Just used it today to flush out stainless steel (non acr) lines (Rx11). I agree you have to have some kind of restriction on the back end to biuld up pressure. I also wonder how well it does on some of the bigger tubing 1 3/8+. The last post linked to some kind of flush gun. Any luck with these? The main problem with (Rx11) is the price.
    I have the gun and have used it on 1 3/8 inch lines. Just takes a few more cans and a 250 lb cylinder of nitrogen for the flush process. Then a nice long purge.
    I have done so much with so little for so long, that now I can do almost anything with nothing at all.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,925
    Quote Originally Posted by Tommy1010 View Post
    Ditto, had a water cooled package unit with water breach in condenser. Ended up dumping about a gallon of water out of system. Did the R-11 Flush 2twice...(2 cans) Lots of nitro, and quadruple evac. Replaced FD, EXP valve and let it rip. Waited one week and replaced FD again. Runs like a beauty, dry as a bone. Only thing I wished I would have done also, is put a suc line fd for as much water as I had. Next time i guess.

    How do you kn ow it wasn't the nitrogen flush that did the real work of getting the water out instead of the chemical flush?



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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    435
    For the waterlogged condenser, I personally would have done a good long nitro purge to get out the majority of the water, then pull a vaccum, then RX11, more nitro, more vaccums, new LL and SL dryer, swap cores yada yada. But if it worked, then you saved a lot of time over my process.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Rockledge, Florida
    Posts
    52

    R-22 to R-410A Flushing

    Hey Guys as the manufacturer of Product YYZ, I can tell you that with a R-22 to R-410A change out, it is always best to change the line sets (since the diameter for 410A systems is different), but if you can’t change the line sets you should flush them. The whole idea of creating a restriction on the end is to allow the flushing solution to stay in the system longer and slow the evaporation, due to the increased pressure. The nitrogen pre-flush is to get the easy stuff out first and the post nitrogen flush is to blow any residue out before evacuation. While the System flush will be totally removed with evacuation, the dissolved contaminants will be re-deposited (upon evaporation) if not blown out.

    I think the Product YYZ is the best product out there and would be willing to send you a free can to try, as long as you write a post on your thoughts after trying it. Good or bad, just document what you thought. If you want a can, send me an email with your business address. I wont send to any homeowners, since this is for professional use only.

    Remember, you must also do a good job of evacuating the system to at least 500 microns, since the new POE and PVE oils love water. Mineral oil would saturated with water at 25 PPM, but POE can hold 2,500 PPM, 100 times more water (even worse for PVE). The water turns the oil to a thick molasses consistency over time, and the compressor fails for lack of lubrication or the expansion device clogs. The fastest way to get to such a deep vacuum is a triple evacuation. Always change the Filter/Drier any time the system is opened.

    Hope my two cents is worth at least that.
    Last edited by beenthere; 01-26-2012 at 07:50 PM. Reason: removed product name

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Salt Lake City/Tooele
    Posts
    2,467
    Been stating this over and over..not until I see or hear from ANY of the compressor manufactures or equipment manufactures they approve this or any similar product. I will stick with their current guidelines.

    Copeland says NO

    Bristol says NO

    Carlyle/Carrier says NO

    Tecumseh says NO

    Alliance/Trane says NO

    Maneurop/Danfoss says NO


    Copeland states and is echoed by Lennox and other manufactures:

    "There are a wide variety of flushing agents available in the market today. None of these agents have been fully tested. Flushing agents typically contain high boiling point fluids and may be difficult to fully remove from the system. Therefore, the ONLY flushing agent recommended is HCFC−22 refrigerant....
    Although mineral oil and POE are not interchangeable, less than 5% residual oil remaining in the system will result in MINIMAL loss of new system performance. To minimize the amount of residual oil in the systems, drain oil from low spots or traps and flush with HCFC−22 refrigerant using flushing and recovery methods outline by the manufactures."

    Outlined Procedure for flushing with R-22:

    REQUIRED EQUIPMENT
    Equipment required to flush the existing line set after installation of new indoor coil and outdoor unit.
    *Two clean HCFC−22 recovery bottles,
    * Oilless recovery machine with pump-down feature,
    * Two gauge sets (one for HCFC−22; one for
    HFC−410A).
    PROCEDURE
    1. Connect the following:
    a HCFC−22 cylinder with clean refrigerant to the
    suction service valve,
    b HCFC−22 gauge set to the liquid line valve,
    c Recovery machine with an empty recovery tank to
    the gauge set.
    2. Set the recovery machine for liquid recovery and start
    the recovery machine. Open the gauge set valves to
    allow the recovery machine to pull a vacuum on the
    existing system line set and indoor unit coil.
    3. Invert the cylinder of clean HCFC−22 and open its
    valve to allow liquid refrigerant to flow into the system
    through the suction line valve. Allow the refrigerant to
    pass from the cylinder and through the line set and the
    indoor unit coil before it enters the recovery machine.
    4. After all of the liquid refrigerant has been recovered,
    switch the recovery machine to suction recovery so
    that all of the HCFC−22 suction is recovered. Allow the
    recovery machine to pull a vacuum on the system.
    5. Close the valve on the inverted HCFC−22 drum and
    the gauge set valves. Pump the remaining refrigerant
    out of the recovery machine and turn the machine off.
    6. Use dry nitrogen to break the vacuum on the
    refrigerant lines and indoor unit coil before removing
    the recovery machine, gauges and refrigerant drum.


    As for cleaning up after a burn-out you will not utilize this process, but follow the compressor manufactures directions. None of the manufactures approve any flushes after a burn-out or any form of additives, neutralizers, etc. They all have very explicit instructions that can be easily found in any of their literature sections of their web sites.

    Copeland:
    http://www.emersonclimate.com/en-US/...formation.aspx

    Bristol:
    http://www.bristolcompressors.com/BCWQ01.aspx?type=1

    Tecumseh:
    http://202.56.127.90/nacg/service_data.php

    Carlyle/Carrier:
    http://www.carlylecompressor.com/cor...TI9588,00.html

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    So.Cal
    Posts
    443
    slctech has done the homework. This is why we come to this board to get the true information.

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