Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    10
    Post Likes

    Opinion on meter

    So I'm going into service, I'll be riding along and start off doing PMs and in the future running service calls. We primarily do residential and light commercial. I went to trade school for automotive and ended up on Hvac field. Instructor would always talk about fluke being the best so I'm wondering if that's true for Hvac, or what do you guys recommend?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Phoenix Arizona
    Posts
    1,477
    Post Likes
    People will recommend field piece or fluke. In my experience(20 years doing commercial/industrial) fluke has been way more reliable and more expensive. I have owned 2 fluke 902's in that time. First one still works fine it's just beaten up. The two items I bought from field piece broke within a year...
    "If history repeats itself I am so getting a dinosaur"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Posts
    7
    Post Likes
    For a DMM I would recommend Fluke.

    For commercial/industrial my go to is a 289 and a 1587 with an i400 clamp. Between those two you you can cover just about anything you would expect to encounter i.e. control loops, VFDs, megger motor windings and circuits, even datalogging to find intermittent problems.

    For resi and even some light commercial I use a 902. Has all the functions you would need for troubleshooting on service calls.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Western Wa.
    Posts
    3,154
    Post Likes
    Fluke 325. I personally wouldn't use any tool with piece in the name
    UA Proud

    "Phfft! Facts. You can use them to prove anything." Homer Simpson

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    TN
    Posts
    355
    Post Likes
    UEI makes good meters for a very good price. Got mine for around 60$.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    romulus, mi
    Posts
    216
    Post Likes
    there is a t lest one or 2 other threads on this but as has been said its personal preference I have a fluke that sits in a drawer in case i need a backup but my field-piece meters have never failed me but i am nice to my tools so i honestly don't know how they last if you toss them around as this isn't something i do lol.
    RTB Mechanical
    734-315-0064
    http://rtbmechanical.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    South West Ohio
    Posts
    424
    Post Likes
    You will find like autos, everyone has one they love and one they hate. I have used fieldpiece meters, scales, gauges for 20 years going all the way back to the original stick meter. I have had an occasional problem with a piece or two, but FP has always fixed the tool without any problems. Even if they were slightly out of the warranty period. I have never used a fluke meter, so I cant say they are better or worse. But I have had no problems and will continue to use Fieldpiece tools.

  8. Likes 50hdmc liked this post
  9. #8
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    SE Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,728
    Post Likes
    I look for meters that have a quick response time and have always found Fluke to consistently meet that. The quick response time is very beneficial when trouble shooting issues. Durability I think is lacking but it is a precision instrument and should be treated with care. I started out using analog Amprobe clamp meters. I have owned one UEI and was not impressed. It has every function possible, just the response time was slow.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    10
    Post Likes
    Thread Starter
    Thank you all for the input, Im thinking of buying the Fluke 325 but my coworker keeps insisting I need to buy one that measures Millivolts. I've also looked into the Fluke 116/323 but haven't made the final decision....

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Western Wa.
    Posts
    3,154
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by Nando17 View Post
    Thank you all for the input, Im thinking of buying the Fluke 325 but my coworker keeps insisting I need to buy one that measures Millivolts. I've also looked into the Fluke 116/323 but haven't made the final decision....
    Millivolts are good for measuring outputs of thermocouples and pilot generators and signal inputs on commercial controls. Also the 325 is a true RMS meter but the 116/325 is a good combo for Resi work. I do a bunch of work in some very technical places from giant server rooms to places where parts for missiles are made and have only seen Fluke and Simpson meters there.
    UA Proud

    "Phfft! Facts. You can use them to prove anything." Homer Simpson

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    1,678
    Post Likes
    Quote Originally Posted by buttwheat View Post
    Millivolts are good for measuring outputs of thermocouples and pilot generators and signal inputs on commercial controls. Also the 325 is a true RMS meter but the 116/325 is a good combo for Resi work. I do a bunch of work in some very technical places from giant server rooms to places where parts for missiles are made and have only seen Fluke and Simpson meters there.
    I don't think you'll see UEI or TPI there.

    Sent using Tapatalk

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    New Mexico
    Posts
    7,476
    Post Likes
    Your instructor couldn't know what the best meter out there is unless he qualified all the others. It's the parrot speaking.
    Was a time where a Simpson 360 (was it 360?) was the meter to have. That along with an Amprobe. Believe it, Fluke is not the only good meter out there. Most Fluke fans were issued the meter when they were hired so don't know any better.
    For years I used a BK Precision. Great meter and very tough. Not sure if they are still in that market.
    If I had my druthers, and I do, I would want a simple meter w/o bells as a go to meter. Something fairly basic like an ampclamp with other basic stuff. Along with that, a more sophisticated meter that had all the other bells that would not come out unless necessary. I'd add an inexpensive analog meter to eliminate any ghost readings on those circuits where a digital is too reactive. I used to also have a Simpson analog ohm meter I liked a lot. I dropped it#@$$@ Then I have to have my Biddle megger.
    But starting out it's surprising how far an inexpensive meter will take you. I had an old analog amprobe and an analog VOM and don't remember the name. Capacitors were tested with an ohm meter or a device called a Cappy. They didn't tell the capacitance but few cared as long as it tested good. Today capacitors are routinely changed because they are "Not within specs". even though they seem to work fine. I know someone might say "Oh my God your going to burn out the motor" Probably not...
    The basics Volts, amps, ohms will be most of what you'll need to know starting out Other stuff can come later. Get a small tackle box for all the jumpers, adapters, special testers, and other goodies you'll collect.
    If your co-worker told you needed to measure millivolts go to Honeywell web site so you will know what the readings mean. Millivolts can be difficult to cypher because they have to be used with a graph. Hold and drop out stuff.
    I should have played the g'tar on the MTV. MK

    You can be anything you want......As long as you don't suck at it.

    SMW Lu49

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Posts
    3
    Post Likes
    I have a fluke, a fieldpiece sc440, and an ideal meter. I'm the only tech I've ever hear of that uses ideal brand btw. I use the Ideal hvac meter for the average everyday abuse cause it ain't real expensive, the my fp sc440 if I get in a bind, and my fluke is my baby, I love it and only break it out if I have to, but keep this in mind... 90 percent of the issues a tech deals with requires a meter so make damn sure you have backups just in case one or even two fail, don't get caught with you're pants down!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor MagazineThe place where Electrical professionals meet.