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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Have any of you used R22A?

    Have any of u
    Used R22A refrigerant?
    Some one selling it in Craigslist
    Any info is appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
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    Maine
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    Quote Originally Posted by shaka View Post
    Have any of u
    Used R22A refrigerant?
    Some one selling it in Craigslist
    Any info is appreciated.
    Nope, haven't tried it, nor would I. For one it's not SNAP approved, and two it's highly flammable. In order to use flammable refrigerants the system needs to be designed for safety, also your service tools need to be designed for flammable refrigerants. I wouldn't buy my refrigerants from craigslist, I buy them from my supply house, sure it costs more, but I know that I am buying virgin refrigerant and not something unknown. Someday we will be able to use flammable refrigerants with safety and SNAP approval in comfort cooling, but until that day I will use what is considered safe and approved. Just my

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    nebraska
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    There's a few threads about it. Bottom line it's a zeotropic blend that's mainly propane and at this time not legal to use in home AC's. Can be used in small appliances though. Requires explosion proof reclaim machines .

    Just dreading the day I come across it in a system because joe handyman bought it on ebay( no epa cert required). Cheaper than R22 and sold to anybody is a disaster waiting to happen IMO.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    WV
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    !

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    WV
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    wow

    Quote Originally Posted by martyinlincoln View Post
    There's a few threads about it. Bottom line it's a zeotropic blend that's mainly propane and at this time not legal to use in home AC's. Can be used in small appliances though. Requires explosion proof reclaim machines .

    Just dreading the day I come across it in a system because joe handyman bought it on ebay( no epa cert required). Cheaper than R22 and sold to anybody is a disaster waiting to happen IMO.
    thats a scary thing....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Acworth, GA
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    Your better off getting R-422D as a replacement. You lose a little bit efficiency but it's way better then the other stuff that have propane in them.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Lowcountry, SC
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    422D has isobutane in it 421A is the only MO refrigerant out there (I think) being used as a replacement w/o hydrocarbons in it. To the explosion hazard concern, has anyone here not witnessed a Gomer turn an oil saturated lineset into a flamethrower? This 22A should not be used for only 1 reason- it is not approved.

  8. Likes SuperTech2010 liked this post
  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Acworth, GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nonintelligetis View Post
    422D has isobutane in it 421A is the only MO refrigerant out there (I think) being used as a replacement w/o hydrocarbons in it. To the explosion hazard concern, has anyone here not witnessed a Gomer turn an oil saturated lineset into a flamethrower? This 22A should not be used for only 1 reason- it is not approved.
    http://www.honeywell-refrigerants.co...genetron-422d/

    Odd, your right it does have isobutane. But it also says its "Flammable range, %vol. in air (Based on ASHRAE Standard 34 with Match Ignition) : None"
    And it also has an "ANSIASHRAE Standard 36-1992 Safety Group Classification: A1" . I am confused. LOLL

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Delaware, USA
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    There are a number of refrigerant blends that contain very small amounts of hydrocarbons (MO99, 422D, 417A, etc.) in the 2-3 % range. Since the hydrocarbons are only present in minor amounts and the majority of the blend is a nonflammable like HFC-134a or HFC-125 the overall blend is non-flammable. In order to receive an A1 listing from ASHRAE, the blend must be tested both "as formulated" and under worst case fractionation conditions and remain non-flammable.

    As mentioned in an earlier post, 22A is essentially all hydrocarbons and very flammable. It is not SNAP listed by the EPA and should be avoided entirely. Best bet is to stick with a reliable refrigerant supplier.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Hallandale Beach, FL.
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    A leak check with a halide torch will get exciting !
    I miss you mom and dad.

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    in a house, Appomattox, Va.
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    ha! leak test w/match would get some excitement
    Col 3:23


    questions asked, answers received, ignorance abated

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Delaware, USA
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    EPA Talking Points re: r-22a

    EPA has posted official position on flammable hydrocarbon refrigerants: www.epa.gov/ozone/snap/r22a.html

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
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    Sorry wrong post

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