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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    fort walton beach fl.
    Posts
    790
    Quote Originally Posted by nchvac View Post
    So what does the normal service call like this involve? Do you guys do refrigeration work as well? Ice makers?
    Yes, basically when I go in a restaurant I want them to call me for everything, A/C's, ice machines, coolers, freezers and cooking equipment. I however will not work on dishwashers and coffee machines.


    I also do Residential HVAC too.

    Being diversified in this economy is king. When the a/c, refrigeration side is slow, I'm normally slammed on the cooking equipment stuff and vise versa.
    http://acfwb.com/

    "The best preparation for good work tomorrow is to do good work today"

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,143
    I have my refrigeration license, but I do mostly hvac repair. Been thinking of getting more into the refrigeration side of things. Oh I have electrical license as well. When do you normally get your service calls on refrigeration and restaurant equipment?
    I am also looking at getting more into ice machines as that is part of refrigeration work.
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    fort walton beach fl.
    Posts
    790
    Quote Originally Posted by nchvac View Post
    I have my refrigeration license, but I do mostly hvac repair. Been thinking of getting more into the refrigeration side of things. Oh I have electrical license as well. When do you normally get your service calls on refrigeration and restaurant equipment?
    I am also looking at getting more into ice machines as that is part of refrigeration work.
    Pretty much year round.
    Check your messages
    http://acfwb.com/

    "The best preparation for good work tomorrow is to do good work today"

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    fort walton beach fl.
    Posts
    790
    For ice machine training I would be looking into the manufacture schools they put on at the factory. Hoshizaki has a two course at their factory in Atlanta Ga.

    I would be leary about the 1/2 seminars that they put on around the country. These tend to be more about their new and improve product and ends up being more of a sales seminar and very little "training".
    http://acfwb.com/

    "The best preparation for good work tomorrow is to do good work today"

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    ohio
    Posts
    140
    dont you have to be sponsered to become a member of cfesa

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,143
    Offer someone in Greensboro, NC $730 or so for their membership, and I imagine they will find you a sponsor if needed.
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lady Lake, Florida
    Posts
    799
    I looked into cfesa's web site thinking it was something for a technician to join but apparently not. It's for business owners in food service equipment repair. Bummer. I'll find something.

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,143
    Let me know if you do. But do note that they do have Technician workshops at what appears to be a nice lab in Charlotte, and they do have a couple of books for gas steam and electrical that they are using for a text book at these classes, so I think there may be some more looking to do. You don't have to be a member, but the classes are a lot higher if not.
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  9. #22

    a little history

    I attended trade school for refrigeration/a-c in 1973; as a young musician, I wanted a trade which would pay better than driving a cab in N.Y.C. like the other musicians. At that time, I had a pretty good working knowledge of electric motors, pumps, oil burners, etc. After getting some experience in the domestic refrigeration field, I went to work for a guy in Washington, D.C. who had a maintenance company; we worked on everything from restaurant equipment (virtually everything you'd find in a restaurant kitchen, comm'l. laundry equipment, comm'l. a/c and heat, refrigeration, ice makers, you name it-we worked on it. I worked on everything from under-counter fridges to the boilers at the Mayflower Hotel. This man is the kind of boss/teacher one can only hope to encounter-a real engineer, teacher, taskmaster, etc. Other than a couple of years when I worked for Marriott (food service) as a technician, I've been on my own ever since. I live on the outer Cape (Cod), a seasonal restaurant-rich environment, and have plenty of work. In the off-season, my "ahead-thinking" customers have me do preventive maintenance to get them ready for the tourist season, when everything gets hammered. Also in the off-season, my Mass. oil burner license comes in very handy.

  10. #23
    Add-on to the above: In short, if you apply yourself and learn all you can about as much different equipment as you can, you'll always work. Versatility is a good idea, too; example: one of my customers had a bad fan motor on a Southbend convection oven. A replacement motor retails for about $1100. I opened up the motor and discovered a broken plastic part in the starting switch. Because I had a similar switch from a junked motor in my "junk" box, I was able to repair it for about $500 (including repacking the ball bearings!). They appreciate stuff like that, especially when they're operating on a thin profit margin. As far as where to get parts, I use PartsDirect.com, Partstown.com, Global Industrial (belts, pulleys, etc. especially), Grainger when I must (they're high) or when time is of the essence, as they'll get you what you need as fast as you need it. Other than that, there are regional suppliers I use. Use the internet and the yellow pages.

  11. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    51
    Quote Originally Posted by smurphy View Post
    Yes, basically when I go in a restaurant I want them to call me for everything, A/C's, ice machines, coolers, freezers and cooking equipment. I however will not work on dishwashers and coffee machines.


    I also do Residential HVAC too.

    Being diversified in this economy is king. When the a/c, refrigeration side is slow, I'm normally slammed on the cooking equipment stuff and vise versa.
    The company I worked for is geared the same way -- service everything in the restaurant. however, we do handle dish machines and coffee machines also. Just out of sheer curiosity, why do yo not? I understand that coffee machines normally end up in lime/scale issues, kind of the same with dish machines until you reach Hobart flight-throughs and that type of crap gets way too involved for my liking.

  12. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    fort walton beach fl.
    Posts
    790
    Quote Originally Posted by bohncoils View Post
    The company I worked for is geared the same way -- service everything in the restaurant. however, we do handle dish machines and coffee machines also. Just out of sheer curiosity, why do yo not? I understand that coffee machines normally end up in lime/scale issues, kind of the same with dish machines until you reach Hobart flight-throughs and that type of crap gets way too involved for my liking.
    I really never have gotten the training. Also, In my area. The guy who sells the coffee, works on the coffee machines and the guy who sells the chemicals for the dishwashers works on the dishwasher.
    http://acfwb.com/

    "The best preparation for good work tomorrow is to do good work today"

  13. #26
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Albany, Georgia
    Posts
    36
    I use this company for aftermarket dishwasher parts:
    Thehttp://www.icicustomparts.com
    They are also helpful as far as minor tech support.
    We are a member of CFESA. There are various levels of membership. We are the lowest which is an affiliate. CFESA will get you recognized with some manufacturers and allow you to do some warranty work. You won't make money doing warranty work, but it will get you in the door with some customers.

    Let me warn you, this is a TOUGH service business to be in. It is rewarding and there is money in it. I think the real trick is to have sharp guys that are willing to do just about anything.

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