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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193

    The business of food service equipment

    So how does one find themselves in the food service business, and where do you go to learn what is needed to profiently offer this service? And where do you get your parts?
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    308
    i was thrown into it i needed a job , i said i could do it and he bilieved me. i become good at it , learn by experiance

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    fort walton beach fl.
    Posts
    790
    I've been doing since I been in the field. A wiring diagram and sequence of operation you should be able to figure anything out. If that doesn't work, tech support can be your lifeline.
    http://acfwb.com/

    "The best preparation for good work tomorrow is to do good work today"

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Western Kentucky
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by smurphy View Post
    I've been doing since I been in the field. A wiring diagram and sequence of operation you should be able to figure anything out. If that doesn't work, tech support can be your lifeline.
    Definitely agree with you on that smurphy

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193
    how do you get the tech support numbers? Are they on the equipment, or do you have to go online? Are the gas pressure settings the same as we see in heating, and do you have ports to check the pressures easily?
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    fort walton beach fl.
    Posts
    790
    Quote Originally Posted by nchvac View Post
    how do you get the tech support numbers? Are they on the equipment, or do you have to go online? Are the gas pressure settings the same as we see in heating, and do you have ports to check the pressures easily?
    All of my techs have a laptop in their van, so finding wiring diagrams, tech support numbers come pretty easily.

    Most of the time the gas pressures are the same (3.5 inches), but some do call for 4 inches. Some pressure taps are hard to get to, but are not impossible.

    The techs I hire don't have experience in cooking equipment. I normally start them out doing the "easy" equipment first (steam tables, heat lamps etc etc), then work them up to the harder stuff. I have a tech right now that has been with me for close to 3 years now, and I can throw him at anything.

    Also, If your serious about doing cooking equipment. I would look into becoming a member of CFSEA. They offer training for steam, electric and gas equipment as well as management training, Good luck, Steve
    http://acfwb.com/

    "The best preparation for good work tomorrow is to do good work today"

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Western Kentucky
    Posts
    44
    Smurphy,

    Are you set up to do warranty work for commmercial cooking equipment manufactures? I am considering taking on warranty calls for star mfg. Which would also include wells, Lang, middleby-marshall, a few more. They tell me being an authorized service company will get me paid quicker. As of date, I mainly just do warranty work on what we sell, because there isn't an authorized service agent in reasonable driving distance to do warranty. They also claim they could keep me very busy.


    Anyone else that does routine warranty work for these companies please chime in and let me know the good and the bad.


    Also, I personally pack the Motorola xoom with me for access to wiring diagrams, schematics, and to access the mfg website. Generally if I get a call on a piece of equipment I am not familiar with, I will download any helpful service documentation before going to the location. This has saved me many times, and can usually determine cause of the problem without having to sit on hold with tech support. Not always though, and usually tech support can steer you in the right direction.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    fort walton beach fl.
    Posts
    790
    Quote Originally Posted by arnoldbta View Post
    Smurphy,

    Are you set up to do warranty work for commmercial cooking equipment manufactures? I am considering taking on warranty calls for star mfg. Which would also include wells, Lang, middleby-marshall, a few more. They tell me being an authorized service company will get me paid quicker. As of date, I mainly just do warranty work on what we sell, because there isn't an authorized service agent in reasonable driving distance to do warranty. They also claim they could keep me very busy.


    Anyone else that does routine warranty work for these companies please chime in and let me know the good and the bad.


    Also, I personally pack the Motorola xoom with me for access to wiring diagrams, schematics, and to access the mfg website. Generally if I get a call on a piece of equipment I am not familiar with, I will download any helpful service documentation before going to the location. This has saved me many times, and can usually determine cause of the problem without having to sit on hold with tech support. Not always though, and usually tech support can steer you in the right direction.


    Normally warranty work doesn't pay a decent labor rate (some do, some Don't), And if your a authorized service rep, you have to stock parts that the manufacture tells you to stock.

    I will do warranty work for my normal customers, main reason is I don't want another company to have face time with my customer.

    I will say that becoming a authorized service rep can open more opportunities to gaining more customers.
    http://acfwb.com/

    "The best preparation for good work tomorrow is to do good work today"

  9. #9

    a little history

    I attended trade school for refrigeration/a-c in 1973; as a young musician, I wanted a trade which would pay better than driving a cab in N.Y.C. like the other musicians. At that time, I had a pretty good working knowledge of electric motors, pumps, oil burners, etc. After getting some experience in the domestic refrigeration field, I went to work for a guy in Washington, D.C. who had a maintenance company; we worked on everything from restaurant equipment (virtually everything you'd find in a restaurant kitchen, comm'l. laundry equipment, comm'l. a/c and heat, refrigeration, ice makers, you name it-we worked on it. I worked on everything from under-counter fridges to the boilers at the Mayflower Hotel. This man is the kind of boss/teacher one can only hope to encounter-a real engineer, teacher, taskmaster, etc. Other than a couple of years when I worked for Marriott (food service) as a technician, I've been on my own ever since. I live on the outer Cape (Cod), a seasonal restaurant-rich environment, and have plenty of work. In the off-season, my "ahead-thinking" customers have me do preventive maintenance to get them ready for the tourist season, when everything gets hammered. Also in the off-season, my Mass. oil burner license comes in very handy.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    working overtime
    Posts
    851
    where i work we keep the cold side and hot side separate. most refer/hvac guys don't wanna work on fryers and visa versa. just my 2 cents. ill fix some oven and stuff on call but dont want it to be my daily thing. my company does. refer,ac,cooking equipment,ice machines, beverage equipment and anythings else a restaurant can throw are way. they tried to make themselves a one stop shop.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Chicagoland Area
    Posts
    4,828
    Quote Originally Posted by cavalieri85 View Post
    where i work we keep the cold side and hot side separate. most refer/hvac guys don't wanna work on fryers and visa versa. just my 2 cents. ill fix some oven and stuff on call but dont want it to be my daily thing. my company does. refer,ac,cooking equipment,ice machines, beverage equipment and anythings else a restaurant can throw are way. they tried to make themselves a one stop shop.
    Here too. Different labor rates are charged. Hot side is considerably less than cold side. That being said, hot side is non union.
    Officially, Down for the count

    YOU HAVE TO GET OFF YOUR ASS TO GET ON YOUR FEET

    I know enough to know, I don't know enough
    Liberalism-Ideas so good they mandate them

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Lexington, NC
    Posts
    5,193
    So what does the normal service call like this involve? Do you guys do refrigeration work as well? Ice makers?
    The main thing is to keep the main thing the main thing!

    If "the grass is greener on the other side", it likely has been fertilized with Bull$hit!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Western Kentucky
    Posts
    44
    Quote Originally Posted by nchvac View Post
    So what does the normal service call like this involve? Do you guys do refrigeration work as well? Ice makers?

    Just recently on the refrigeration side of things.

    Definitely ice makers, and anything else you would find in a commercial kitchen. Some Calls are easy and others require some thought. Sometimes you can fix it on the spot, and others you have to wait on a part. Sometimes a good cleaning is all a piece of equipment needs.

    Then when the cost of repair is not reasonable, you can sell them another one.

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