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  1. #1

    Bryant Evolution system condensate drainage

    I had a Bryant system (355CAV + 186B + CNPVP) installed recently and it passed the code inspection. However, I just realized there is no trap on the evaporator coil drain line and I'm trying to figure out if my arrangement is as it should be.

    For now, the attached drawing will have to do. My furnace is configured for upflow. There appears to be that internal trap on the furnace drain line but there is no trap on the evaporator drain line. The two drain lines merge into one which runs into the floor and then discharges outside near the ground.

    Is this a proper way to drain such Bryant gear? The best way?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Central Oregon
    Posts
    749
    If the coil condensate drain and furnace condenate are tied together. The coil drain should have a trap on it.
    If you think our goverment is screwed up. You haven't lived in another country.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    south al.
    Posts
    111
    Where do the two tee together? If the evaporator ties to the main line going out after the trap from the furnace you will be ok but do let the trap dry up during the summer and before next heating season. If it is before the trap then you definatly want trap both lines or the trap on the furnace side is no good. If you had seperate drain lines from each component going all the way outside then you would only need to trap the furnace line.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    south al.
    Posts
    111
    Sorry just caught a mistake on previous post, do not let the furnace trap dry up during the summer.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Central Fla.
    Posts
    311
    If you have a furnace with an a/c coil on top you don't need to trap it.Traps only need to be on the negative air side of the air stream(like an airhandler where the blower is above the drain pulling air into it to prevent water from draining,the trap with water in it stops this from happening).On a furnace with a coil on top you are on the positive side of the air stream and air blows down the drain.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    3,504
    I can only assume you are in an area that does not freeze in winter. Otherwise this furnace drain will freeze over. In our area we can't drain a furnace outside as it will freeze over in winter. OK for AC drain, but not for furnace.

  7. #7
    The coil condensate line and the furnace condensate line join after the internal, factory-installed furnace condensate line trap. My furnace is upflow with the coil on the top positive pressure side.

    Attached is a scan of page 43 from the installation manual, which says "The furnace, A/C, and humidifier drains may be combined and drained together. The A/C drain must have an external, field-supplied trap prior to the furnace drain connection.". Emphasis mine.

    I think that means my arrangement is not permitted by Bryant. To be honest though, I'm not really sure why/when it would actually cause a problem. Thoughts on that?

    Edit: BTW, yes, it does get well below freezing here. I do question whether the existing arrangement will prove satisfactory from a freezing point of view. AFAIK, running it to any kind of existing drain is not an option. So if the fluid isn't warm enough to keep from freezing up, then it will have to be heat tape, creating a small underground drainage system, or something else. I'll be watching it very closely this winter.
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    Last edited by IrishCoffee; 12-15-2011 at 02:55 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Central Oregon
    Posts
    749
    Quote Originally Posted by IrishCoffee View Post
    .
    Attached is a scan of page 43 from the installation manual, which says "The furnace, A/C, and humidifier drains may be combined and drained together. The A/C drain must have an external, field-supplied trap prior to the furnace drain connection.". Emphasis mine.

    I think that means my arrangement is not permitted by Bryant. To be honest though, I'm not really sure why/when it would actually cause a problem. Thoughts on that?

    I'll be watching it very closely this winter.
    I read the samething on combining drains in our Lennox intall manuals before I posted. The only reason I can think of requiring the trap is to prevent the positive pressure from entering the furnace via a dry furnace trap and sffecting the pressure switches.
    If you have no choice but to drain outside with freezing temps your contractor should of set something up. I wont put them in freeze zones. without a sure way to keep it from freezing and I haven't heard of one yet.
    If you think our goverment is screwed up. You haven't lived in another country.

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