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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,164

    I hate writing a bill when

    i cant find the leak.

    Victor under table , reach in freezer.

    R134 which was the absolute worst idea ever for freezers.

    Had this thing in pieces , 250 lb nitro, leak detector sniffing around , and dumping bubbles all over everything.

    It has a slight film of oil around compressor term housing but i was like ... how would it get all over the outside of the housing ??

    Charged him for refrig and minimum serv call rate and told him i cannot find the leak.

    Im hoping the shraders were leaking before or something , but they werent when i left.

    I dunno

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Over Here
    Posts
    1,105
    Keep a keen eye out for red-eyed kitchen staff observing from a distance... They know where it went.

    Seriously, 250# nitrogen on 134A? A lot of them are the evaps coils. You'll find it.

    I agree on 134A and freezers. It is tough to not let them operate in a vacuum - especially when the evap coils begin fouling and coil temp drops to maintain temp.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Woodbridge Twp, NJ
    Posts
    1,307
    If they DO start running in a vacuum and the leak is in the evap, beware of green slime!
    Every customer you take for granted today will be someone else's tomorrow.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
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    3,164
    Quote Originally Posted by DLZ Dan View Post
    If they DO start running in a vacuum and the leak is in the evap, beware of green slime!
    had 20 low and 200 high , and i've not seen many 134 freezers. Do tell about said slime you speak of...

    Is this something i need to call Ghost Busters about ?? I seem to recall one of the ghosts leaving alot of slime...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    501
    When I add charge to any refrigeration or air conditioning equipment. I always tag the equipment with the date, the amount of refrigerant, the type refrigerant, and where the leak is or where I checked for the leak.
    This way the customer will feel better about our charges. Also it helps me or any other Tech on the next call on that equipment.
    Sometimes it takes several battles to win the war...

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Snapperhead View Post
    had 20 low and 200 high , and i've not seen many 134 freezers. Do tell about said slime you speak of...

    Is this something i need to call Ghost Busters about ?? I seem to recall one of the ghosts leaving alot of slime...
    Were these pressures at setpoint temp? Seem very high, even under warm pull down.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,164
    Quote Originally Posted by smilies View Post
    Were these pressures at setpoint temp? Seem very high, even under warm pull down.
    oh crap , the one i just did was still on my mind , which was a 409 retrofit unit with those pressures. Fan was cracked and slapping the shroud. I told that guy he needed a good coil clean and he said he can do that himself.

    The 134 unit we are talking about was 175 and 10 , i stand corrected.
    Last edited by Snapperhead; 12-13-2011 at 07:08 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    DFW, TX
    Posts
    664
    Lately every time I leak check an R134a self contained unit, I start by adding as much R22 as it will take. Then I add Nitrogen until about 250#. If that doesn't work, I go to 400#. I've gone as high as 450# one time, could not find this small leak, but at 450# I saw bubbles just coming through the corroded copper - no cracks or anything, just coming out.

    Also with R134a and cap tubes sometimes its hard to tell if its a clogged cap tube or low on charge. So my first step is to recover, vacuum and weigh in virgin charge. Then if pressures are normal, I know it was a charge issue. If not I know it was a cap tube issue. It works every time and there's no second guessing yourself.

    But I agree, it doesn't feel good to charge a customer a bunch of money for refrigerant and labor and end result is you didn't find any leak.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Chandler
    Posts
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by trippintl0 View Post
    Lately every time I leak check an R134a self contained unit, I start by adding as much R22 as it will take. Then I add Nitrogen until about 250#. If that doesn't work, I go to 400#. I've gone as high as 450# one time, could not find this small leak, but at 450# I saw bubbles just coming through the corroded copper - no cracks or anything, just coming out.

    Also with R134a and cap tubes sometimes its hard to tell if its a clogged cap tube or low on charge. So my first step is to recover, vacuum and weigh in virgin charge. Then if pressures are normal, I know it was a charge issue. If not I know it was a cap tube issue. It works every time and there's no second guessing yourself.

    But I agree, it doesn't feel good to charge a customer a bunch of money for refrigerant and labor and end result is you didn't find any leak.
    follow this advice....it takes more time....but i can't tell you how many service contracts i have taken over because the previous techs didn't diagnosis correctly...restrictions are very common on cap tube systems

    also most do pull vacuum on the low side


    injecting dye is a quick way to get in and out with a quick charge...just be sure to explain this to the customer

    " i can spend hours tryin to find ur leak...or i can add dye and charge up ur system so you can have some functionallity...then return when the problem happens again...which could be a day or even months later...then bust out that UV light and it will stick out like a sore thumb?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,164
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucid View Post

    also most do pull vacuum on the low side
    When i arrived and plugged it in ... it was showing 70 high and -10

    Added 8 ounces and she was at 175ish and 20 real quick, so i reclaimed and began nitro with a squirt of 22






    Quote Originally Posted by Lucid View Post
    injecting dye is a quick way to get in and out with a quick charge...just be sure to explain this to the customer

    " i can spend hours tryin to find ur leak...or i can add dye and charge up ur system so you can have some functionallity...then return when the problem happens again...which could be a day or even months later...then bust out that UV light and it will stick out like a sore thumb?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,164
    Quote Originally Posted by trippintl0 View Post

    Also with R134a and cap tubes sometimes its hard to tell if its a clogged cap tube or low on charge. So my first step is to recover, vacuum and weigh in virgin charge. Then if pressures are normal, I know it was a charge issue. If not I know it was a cap tube issue. It works every time and there's no second guessing yourself.
    Thats a good idea

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Phoenix,AZ
    Posts
    2,877
    Speaking of captubes! I have found leaks on them where it's soldered to the suction line. Did you look there?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    3,164
    Quote Originally Posted by KB Cool View Post
    Speaking of captubes! I have found leaks on them where it's soldered to the suction line. Did you look there?
    yup i've seen them leak there too... this one was not.

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