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  1. #1

    Exclamation Green Tech Needs Help!!!!

    I am a very green tech, and I am looking for help. After graduation there is a great deal of knowledge that I am lacking. We learned next to nothing on boilers. No hands on with oil, and very little with heat pump troubleshooting. Does anybody know where I can find video instruction to help me in these areas? I know of Mynoravideo. The videos can be online, dvd, free, or pay. I just want to hone my skills with as much info as I can get, but I learn better by seeing than reading. Thank you.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Salt Lake City/Tooele
    Posts
    2,467
    How about you just stick with your original post? Sound like a whining broken record...two posts now and just duplicating what many have already attempted to help you with. Here is the link to get you back to your first post.

    http://hvac-talk.com/vbb/showthread....2#post11880162

    In the mean time try

    http://www.hvacchannel.tv/

    http://www.hvacls.com/

    http://www.hvac-for-beginners.com/hv...ng-videos.html very basic

    http://www.rses.org/training.aspx

    A little research and you will find what you are looking for

  3. #3

    current post

    New to the site and someone suggested I move the thread to the tech to tech forum. No whining, just trying to get some info from people with more experience.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Eagle, Idaho
    Posts
    381
    All trade school does is give you the basics.
    It is up to you to llearn the advanced stuff on the job.
    Also, just Google it.
    There are many many things I learned on the job, moreso than school.
    It will come to you in time.
    If you are having specific troubles or qquestions, by all means then post a thread.
    But before you post a new thread, try using the search feature at the top of the page cuz your question may likely be answered and have a bunch of people commenting on it.
    1st off, in this field nobody knows everything.
    Like chillers, boilers, ice machines, pneaumatics. If you are working for a basic residential/light commercial hvac company, all of the above I just mentioned may likely bbe irrelevant and you would never ise that knowledge. In the bay area here EVERYBODY has natural gas and heat pump knowledge is irrelevant. So just focus on the basics 1st.
    Do you live in an area where natural gas is common or standard at places?
    If so then forget about heat pumps.
    But FYK, heat pumps have a couple extra componants. An accumulator, check valves, a reversing valve and a pilot relay to engage the reversing valve and heat strips. A HP tstat will have emergency heat which energizes only the heat strips. Every so often it will go into defrost mode if it detects freezing at the outdoor coil. The reversing valve will switch the direction of flow of refrigerant to basically AC mode to heat back up the outdoor coil and the heat strips will turn on so that way you are not blasting in cold air. But wait, when you switch flow back you would get liquid going to the compressor which could cause slugging. That is what your accumulator is for, to catch that liquid.
    Tell Obama he can keep the change

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    bedford ind
    Posts
    1,088
    Indiana uses gas and heat pumps. I sell condensing furnaces as back- up with heat pump as primary heat source. Very good results. No complaints!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    arizona
    Posts
    5
    hey kid keep your chin up and ignore the 1st idiot that answered. after i got out of trade school me and my dad started our own business. having him show me the ropes was a hell of alot easier then being thrown to the wolves. our 1st year out was great i got a corvette he got a motorhome.... good times

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    383
    Up here in Ottawa, we have a little of everything. Mostly gas in the city and oil or propane out of town. there are heat pumps scattered around too. geothermal, boilers, the list goes on. sooo much to learn. I have only been in the trade since Sept 7th last year and I will agree that you will never stop learning. I'm working on mostly gas furnaces right now tho.
    I have found sometimes it is helpfull to just sit in their basment and read/skim the install manual for some info about the brand your sitting in front of.
    Thanks for posting this qeustion though, as those links will be very helpful to many of us newbies.
    Best of luck in your endevors man!
    Dave

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    377
    So far as troubleshooting, one of the most "revealing" statements I've ever read is this one:

    "Troubleshooting begins with a clear understanding of the expected behavior of the system and the symptoms being observed."

    Understanding the "expected behavior of the system" is the trick. I think every service man develops his own way of doing that. But at some point you have to learn what "something" is supposed to do, and what has to take place, in order for it to do it.

    With electrical stuff, it's usually a matter of circuit analysis. A voltage source connected to a device by some conductors. If the voltage is present and the conductors are continuous, the device will do what it's supposed to do. If it isn't doing it, there's something wrong with the voltage or conductors or device.

    With compressor driven refrigeration, you have to understand boiling/condensing point is a temperature AND a pressure. That's what explains the condensing and evaporating (boiling) process. You have to be able to visualize what's going on inside the condenser and evaporator coils.

    It's not really complicated; you just have to think about it a while.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Charlotte, N.C.
    Posts
    961
    Quote Originally Posted by johnnylaww View Post
    hey kid keep your chin up and ignore the 1st idiot that answered. after i got out of trade school me and my dad started our own business. having him show me the ropes was a hell of alot easier then being thrown to the wolves. our 1st year out was great i got a corvette he got a motorhome.... good times


    Yeah you and your dad should start your own company and buy Corvettes. Solid advice.
    Those who restrain desire do so because theirs is weak enough to be restrained. (William Blake)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,762
    Quote Originally Posted by RURICHIM View Post
    I am a very green tech, and I am looking for help. After graduation there is a great deal of knowledge that I am lacking. We learned next to nothing on boilers. No hands on with oil, and very little with heat pump troubleshooting. Does anybody know where I can find video instruction to help me in these areas? I know of Mynoravideo. The videos can be online, dvd, free, or pay. I just want to hone my skills with as much info as I can get, but I learn better by seeing than reading. Thank you.
    First of all, GET YOUR POST COUNT UP TO 15! Just start commenting on other posts, if you don't have a subject to discuss. Then apply for pro-membership. You will get more info out of experienced techs on the pro side of this forum. Noone knows if you are truly serious if your on the open part of the site.
    Fact is, you're not going to learn in a day, month or year. It takes time, so relax and ENJOY learning. It will keep you interested in the career you've chosen. I've been in the hvac trade for about 17 years, and pick up subjects to research from this site, everyday.
    Great thing is, there are less hvac techs out there than needed. So, we are becoming a more valuable commodity; especially if you're talented.
    "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing" Socrates

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Central Pa.
    Posts
    1
    Do a search on line like they have told you, lots of good instructional video's available now to help you with the basics. Many of us old farts didn't have that option. Be honest with your employer, I respect a new tech much more when he admits his weakness, nothing scares me more than a tech thats only a few years in that tells me how great he is, cause its a given he sucks, lol. Try checking out your family/ friends units, just record the pressures and temp's to get an idea how a unit looks when running properly. Just don't make any changes you are not sure of, trust me, I remember going down that road. Hands on is the best way to learn this stuff, be patient, it only comes with time. The best advice I got when I was starting was to not panic, keep a cool decisive head and take your time, think about your decisions before acting on them. I was lucky when I first started and had an old retired guy that was always home I could call, and he was pretty sharp, spent alot of money on the pay phone back then.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    383
    I found that not being afraid to ask helps a lot! I have encountered a few situations where i was unsure and either radioed someone or wrote it down and asked an old guy in the office the next day. some of the guys at the shop laugh and say im eager... i say im learning and waiting to take their jobs when they retire!! if you can keep finding stuff that interests you in the trade than you will enjoy it for years to come!

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Salt Lake City/Tooele
    Posts
    2,467
    Interesting that I am called an idiot by a guy that has 5 posts and just barely joined this community a week ago

    Not bashing on this young eager guy, just another of the thousand posts asking the same thing.

    RURICHIM, start replying to this post and get your posts up and get yourself access to the locked side of this wonderful forum. That is where us idiots are a bit more patient with the new guys that we know for sure are serious to learn and are not DIYrs playing the "woes me" song.

    I did give you links to some sites that have DVD information. DVD are a good source, but much like a book or basic tech school, you can only absorb so much, but nothing will replace hands-on learning and thrown in the fire forced to learn experiences.

    One of the best resources is your local distributors. Doesn't matter if your company is a Carrier dealer, walk into the Lennox, Trane, whomever dealers and ask to talk with their field tech reps. They love nothing more than a new technician knocking on there door and in need of material to better him/herself. Amazing the free stuff you will acquire. You will find that many will allow you into there classes and training seminars. Give them your name, number, and address and ask to be added to any of their upcoming events.

    At home study and continuous learning will put you miles above the rest. If you have a question, use the wonderful world wide web and research and find the answer. If you are still hazy, ask for clarification here. This site can be unforgiving for those who just want an answer without having done any work before hand to figure it out your self. Admit to the group you have been researching and this is what you understand and this is what is still foggy and enjoy open conversation here.

    I warn you that much like the internet, there is a lot of misinformation out there. Same goes for this site. Many heated arguments have erupted in the quiet halls of this forum over some of the most basic of questions.

    Never stop learning, if this is the field for you, you will find a sick addiction to better yourself and learn every moment of everyday. I would suggest that you take a few additional after hour courses at your local tech school in electronics. A solid foundation in basic electronics, outside what you learned in your HVAC/R course will put you well above the rest. Being able to set back with a schematic and meter and track an issue makes you better than half the guys out there calling themselves pros.

    Figure out what area of this industry you would like to gravitate to. Is just working on residential equipment where you wish to stop at, or would you like to find yourself in the larger commercial world, refrigeration, etc. Start early to set-up a game plan or road map to where you wish to see your career go.

    Last of all, join the RSES/NATE/ICE or work for training on whatever is important in your area. Different locales are big with NATE others have RSES chapters in every city, get licensed or pass the exams that may be required in your state to work legally. No need to be the guy with the vest full of badges at the distributor counter, you will see what I mean. Just realize you are new, you will make mistakes, but learn from those mistakes, and get ready to learn from another.

    Good Luck and welcome to our industry.

    Thats all I have to say about that...Jenny

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