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  1. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    19
    I measured the humidity inside the house, and it is only around 40%. If humidity is not the issue, how come my windows "sweat" so much, and I am more concerned about the ice at the bottom. Is it normal to have so much ice when the inside temperature is at least 65 degree? What else could contribute to the problem?

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,981
    Is the ice on the inside or outside of the window?
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  3. #16
    Originally posted by simoncat
    >>>>I measured the humidity inside the house, and it is only around 40%. If humidity is not the issue, how come my windows "sweat" so much, and I am more concerned about the ice at the bottom. Is it normal to have so much ice when the inside temperature is at least 65 degree? What else could contribute to the problem?<<<<
    Do you have storm windows and/or double pane? Single pane?

  4. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    19
    double pane

  5. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    19
    And the ice is inside the window, that is why i felt it is so strange. The temperature inside the house is at leat 65. It is below zero these several days, and that is why i see thinck ice. Before I think i only see a water condensation, but still that will demange the wood. Even without the ice, I still feel it is somethin I need to fix.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Southold.calm
    Posts
    6,354
    How are the seals on the “Bottom” of the windows. From here it sounds like you have a problem with the windows!

  7. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    19
    That is the puzzling part. If it is the problem with windows, how come all of the sudden, almost all the windows one one side of house (without direct sunshine) ahow similar problem, some are particular bad?

  8. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Rochester, New York
    Posts
    392

    Talking

    dewpoint

  9. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    318
    I think much of what has been said is valid. I am just going to summarize some of it. Condensation on the windows is a function of the temp of the windows and the amount of moisture in the house. Keep the windows above dewpoint and there is no problem. If you did not have a problem with the windows before the new furnace, this would indicate something changed with the level of moisture in the home.

    Bulk water: Obviously, if there is a problem with a leak it must be addressed. Become a detective and go look - sometimes that means being a little invasive.

    Reduced infiltration with the new furnace: This could be your only problem. Older furnaces caused a substantial amount of infiltration which will keep the indoor RH% down.

    Look at other sources: With the reduced infiltration you may have to reduce the amount of water getting into the air. Make sure you use exhaust fans in the bath and kitchen. Look at covering fish tanks - if you have a lot of plants, you may need to cover dirt or something - cover your crawlspace floor with a vapor barrier if appropriate...etc.

    Flue products: Do you have a gas water heater? Make sure the operation of the furnace does not have an adverse impact on the heater venting. Blower driven pressure imbalances due to the more powerful blower on your new furnace are not uncommon and could cause the water heater to not vent. That's a pretty good source of moisture.

    Once all your "source control" issues are addressed, monitor your humidity levels and determine if you need to do something. If your home is fairly tight, for general IAQ and moisture issues, ventilation is not a bad idea. Running an exhaust fan will introduce outdoor air and help you to be where you were before. You could investigate more expensive venitlation systems. A de-humidifier is another option. Another thing that could help condensation on cold nights is to not cover your windows. I have to do that at my house on very cold nights but it does waste energy.

    Hope this helps.

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