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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4
    Does anyone have an idea as to why I am getting such bad ice build-up as shown in this picture? (hopefully the picture works!)

    The furnace is a Coleman D.E.S. 80. Judging by a sticker on the furnace it was installed in Dec 1990.






  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    309

    Normal with this temp

    Natural Gas, when combined with Oxygen for combustion, produces H2O as a combustion product.

    Your car exhaust also produces H2O as a combustion product.

    When water vapor hits cold air, especially where I live (it is 0 deg F in Omaha NE), you will see icicles like that.

    Relax and enjoy the winter!

    cn

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4
    Thanks for the reply.

    It's cold here (-27C/-15F with out the windchill) that's for sure. I am in Winnipeg, MB.

    I guess I am just a little paranoid.

    This is my second winter in the house and the chimney has done this both winters. (it was worse last year..but it was also colder)

    I realize that the warm air hitting cold causes condensation...but looking around at the neighbors, no one else has any signs of ice at all around their chimneys, so I starting to think something might be wrong.

  4. #4
    Originally posted by skid24
    Thanks for the reply.

    It's cold here (-27C/-15F with out the windchill) that's for sure. I am in Winnipeg, MB.

    I guess I am just a little paranoid.

    This is my second winter in the house and the chimney has done this both winters. (it was worse last year..but it was also colder)

    I realize that the warm air hitting cold causes condensation...but looking around at the neighbors, no one else has any signs of ice at all around their chimneys, so I starting to think something might be wrong.
    I'm not a tech (yet), but am wondering if your furnace has a condensate trap on the exhaust vent, close to or inside the furnace. With the amount of condensate that is freezing on the roof, I would think there would be some that is running back down the vent pipe.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    3,182
    I've never seen a Coleman that didn't use a roofjack?
    Metalbestos with no intake?

    What does the D.E.S. mean? Is there an actual model nr?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4
    Originally posted by htg guy
    I've never seen a Coleman that didn't use a roofjack?
    Metalbestos with no intake?

    What does the D.E.S. mean? Is there an actual model nr?

    Not sure what a roofjack is...so can't answer that.

    Not sure what D.E.S means either...That is what is on the front on the furnace on a sticker "D.E.S. 80". I guess the '80' is the furnaces AFUE rating.

    The model number I found on it is: 2880A756

    This is what the piping looks like inside...if that helps.



  7. #7
    Originally posted by skid24
    Originally posted by htg guy
    I've never seen a Coleman that didn't use a roofjack?
    Metalbestos with no intake?

    What does the D.E.S. mean? Is there an actual model nr?

    Not sure what a roofjack is...so can't answer that.
    He's talking about a trailer unit that has a double wall exhaust/intake pipe (all in one), which penetrates the roof.

    Your furnace is a standard unit that doesn't require such an animal.

  8. #8
    >>>>Not sure what a roofjack is...so can't answer that.<<<<
    [/B][/QUOTE]

    [[[[[He's talking about a trailer unit that has a double wall exhaust/intake pipe (all in one), which penetrates the roof.]]]]]

    I could be wrong, but I think a roof jack is commonly known as the contrivance that functions as a seal between a vent pipe and the roof. This "jack" is a combination of metal and rubber. The metal part is nailed or screwed to the roof, while the rubber boot, surrounding the vent pipe, is fastened to the pipe by caulking.

    A double-walled exhaust/intake pipe is known as a concentric vent pipe, and is supplied as a kit to be assembled on site, and fitted to the vents coming from a condensing (high efficiency) furnace.


  9. #9
    Originally posted by whatthehay?
    Originally posted by skid24 >>>>Not sure what a roofjack is...so can't answer that.<<<<
    Originally posted by jultzya
    [[[[[He's talking about a trailer unit that has a double wall exhaust/intake pipe (all in one), which penetrates the roof.]]]]]
    I could be wrong, but I think a roof jack is commonly known as the contrivance that functions as a seal between a vent pipe and the roof. This "jack" is a combination of metal and rubber. The metal part is nailed or screwed to the roof, while the rubber boot, surrounding the vent pipe, is fastened to the pipe by caulking.

    A double-walled exhaust/intake pipe is known as a concentric vent pipe, and is supplied as a kit to be assembled on site, and fitted to the vents coming from a condensing (high efficiency) furnace.

    [/B]
    Don't mess with many trailer units Eh?

    A roof jack is a complete assembly... flashing, intake, exhaust, caps, everything to complete the exhaust and combustion air for a Manufactured Home.

    Concentric mostly refers to a high efficient furnace and some 80% units (like the concentric for Reznor units).

    4000-7101C Standard Roof Jack


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2001
    Posts
    1,874
    I don't like seeing the vent have a reducer on the horizontal section of pipe. It should be in the vertical pipe.

    Measure the size of your pipe and post back, it may be that it's to big at the stack going up.
    Can't tell from the picture. Looks close but can't tell.
    Also would need btu's of the furance and water heater.
    If you try to fail, and succeed.
    Which have you done ?



  11. #11
    Originally posted by Toolpusher
    >>>>I don't like seeing the vent have a reducer on the horizontal section of pipe. It should be in the vertical pipe.<<<<
    It could be that the slightly curved pipe, leaving the furnace, is single wall that connects to a double wall, so it isn't a reducer after all.

    >>>edit... fixed post


    [Edited by jultzya on 02-19-2006 at 03:41 PM]

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2001
    Posts
    1,213

    vent

    With all that foil tape, I would have the vent connector checked - may be enough condensate to rot the piping.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4
    Originally posted by Toolpusher
    I don't like seeing the vent have a reducer on the horizontal section of pipe. It should be in the vertical pipe.

    Measure the size of your pipe and post back, it may be that it's to big at the stack going up.
    Can't tell from the picture. Looks close but can't tell.
    Also would need btu's of the furance and water heater.
    The pipe coming out of the furnace is 4", then it switches to 5" (at the first bend) and is 5" the rest of the way I can see.

    The sticker on the furnace says:

    BTU/HR input 95,000 and Output 80,600.

    The water tank has 33,000 on it.

    Thanks!

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