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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    309
    Hi all,

    I need some expert opinions re gas piping. House is cast-iron from the street to furnaces and HW heaters.

    We are remodelling the kitchen and plan to add a natural gas pipe to a new gas range (previous range was electric).

    Plumber came out and gave estimate:
    a. Cast-Iron piping
    b. Copper
    c. Flexible Stainless Steel piping.

    a is mot expensive.
    c is least expensive (in relative terms, if c is $1 then a is $3 in cost, b in between).

    I am stuck with budget and need to ask people here:

    - If Flexible is that good an inexpensive, why don't the rest of the world use it?
    - I am used to cast-iron because I think cast-iron is the gold standard: solid and last along time. The down side is the cost.

    I am heard somewhere that flexible natural gas piping has had some problems in the past.

    Also I have a friend in Chicago suburb that says flexible gas piping is not allowed per code.

    Any expert opinions out there re flexible gas piping?

    cn
    Omaha NE

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,599
    Copper isn't allowed in many areas. Don't know about your area but around here CSST flexible is very common and works well. That would be my choice. You'll have to find out if it is allowed in your area. Also you need to be trained to use it though I'm sure someone will sell it to anyone

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    309

    in Omaha all 3 are allowed per plumber

    For your information, in Omaha NE, All 3 types are allowed:

    a. Cast-Iron piping
    b. Copper
    c. Flexible Stainless Steel piping.

    (Anywhere banning copper should ban Flexible????)

    I love cast-iron but the cost (parts and labor) is outrageous.

    cn

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Pacific Coast of Canada
    Posts
    4,008
    I'd go copper.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Cabot, PA
    Posts
    177

    CSST Flexable

    I'm with the BaldLoonie on this if your not going with cast iron do the flexable . COPPER NO WAY just a personal preference

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    309

    Google Search on this topic

    I just did a Google Search on this topic:

    "natural gas piping csst faq problems",


    There are alot of pros and cons.

    I am still confused.

    One thin about CSST is although it is called Stainless Steel, plastic is part of the component, and any plastic will fail with time.

    The only question one haswith CSST is whether one lives in that house long enough to see problems.

    Cast-Iron piping lasts 100 years as I see cast-iron gas piping in century-old houses.

    cn

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Cabot, PA
    Posts
    177

    Re: Google Search on this topic

    Originally posted by cn
    I just did a Google Search on this topic:

    "natural gas piping csst faq problems",


    There are alot of pros and cons.

    I am still confused.

    One thin about CSST is although it is called Stainless Steel, plastic is part of the component, and any plastic will fail with time.

    The only question one haswith CSST is whether one lives in that house long enough to see problems.

    Cast-Iron piping lasts 100 years as I see cast-iron gas piping in century-old houses.

    cn

    Just attended a training class for the Gastite System of CSST. http://www.GASTITE.COM They seem to have the best bend retention and are made of the thickest stainless material .010" compared to standard .080" also there system uses a metal to metal flare connection verses the olde fittings that used a gasket or o-ring to seal. Very nice system in my opinion.

    Also the poly coating you are refering to is only for corrosion protection.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    Threaded pipe is BlackIron [BI ].

    CastIron is not threaded, usually => 1.5", for drain piping in residents, or water mains.

    The material selection is locality dependent for all but BI.
    In some areas the trace items in the gas supplied will react with copper, but I have used it for years in my house in northern Indiana, central Tennessee, with NO problems.

    the new pex piping is quick to install and should last 50+ years, whether for water or gas -- just so it is properly rated.

    BI is labor intensive, since most bends require a threaded fitting, the pieces are cut to length, then screwed together. This method has been used for 100+ years.

    make it big & bury it deep!

    BI must be coated when used underground -- very labor intensive.

    in Lewisburg TN, the gas co pulled polyethylene into all BI, mains in the street, branch piping to meter at each house ~1988. They dug into my gravel driveway to cut out the 90 degree ell to get to back of house.

    PE has MUCH less friction because it undergoes LITTLE internal corrosion due to anything in the fluid -- whether gas or liquid. It is inert & tough.

    I have PE from the street main to the water meter, from said meter to the house, except for the last 10ft = copper for electrical grounding into the house, copper in the house to HWH.
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    38

    pipe

    go with flexable piping it's called track pipe yellow in color. and the world does use it that's if it isn't under ground. if under ground use black pipe. cast iron is not to be used on gas it leaks. black malable not cast iron. I would not use copper.
    keep Jesus in control

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    68,776
    CSST where ever possible.

    We use Track pipe mostly, Gastite is thinner, unless they changed their standard in the last year.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    89
    I am gastite certified myself, and will admit that it is a very inexpensive way to run gas piping in a home. The one big problem that I have seen with it though, is that I've seen other peoples installations be without the necessary nil blocks and brackets to ensure that the lines won't be penetrated by nailing.

    This is something that a city inspector could possibly overlook due to the fact that this is a relatively new installation practice. They will simply ask for the installation certificate and maybe check for the wall nail-gaurds like they would with PVC.

    There was this one time on a job, where I had explained to the G/C that I had smelled gas. It took him 2 days to figure it out, and his plumbers, who piped the gas on this property neglected to install the floor plate. The flooring nailer shot a 2 1/2" finish nail through the flooring and right through the gas line.

    This would never had happened with black pipe.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    1,996
    Copper is softer then stainless. I assume it is easier to damage with nails. Go with the flex.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    chicago suburbs
    Posts
    4,422
    bite the bullet and get the black pipe.....it's only natural gas what could go wrong?
    FILL OUT YOUR PROFILE!!

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