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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Alabamer
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    Question Do I really need a 20,000 ohm, 5 watt resister to de-energize a capacitor?

    This is probably a question you electricity-specialists will be able to answer best: I am curious to know whether I can use a fixed resister, one that is cheaper than those 20,000 ohm 5 watt resistors that sell for like $5 each:

    http://www.amazon.com/KOA-Speer-Thru...=2X4KV41DYHD7C

    http://www.amazon.com/KOA-Speer-Thru...=2X4KV41DYHD7C

    Can I really use a different resistor that can accomplish the same task safely, namely one with a higher resistance and lower wattage, or should I not press my luck? lol

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    229
    Screwdriver?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    Alabamer
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    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood650 View Post
    Screwdriver?
    I thought doing that would ruin the screwdriver AND the capacitor? lol

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    229
    How big are the capacitors? I work residential and I just use a screwdriver. I've yet to see anything happen using a screwdriver.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Alabamer
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    5

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood650 View Post
    How big are the capacitors? I work residential and I just use a screwdriver. I've yet to see anything happen using a screwdriver.
    Really? I'm new to the field. I was just curious to know if I could use a diff. standard of resistors just in case (I know, I'm cheap.) If I recall correctly, it was these dudes told me it was a bad idea to use a screwdriver anyway (lol):

    http://books.google.com/books?id=eS_...gbs_navlinks_s

    So if the capacitors are big, then I probably should use a 20k ohm resistor?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    229
    Quote Originally Posted by Epic_Win View Post
    Really? I'm new to the field. I was just curious to know if I could use a diff. standard of resistors just in case (I know, I'm cheap.) If I recall correctly, it was these dudes told me it was a bad idea to use a screwdriver anyway (lol):

    http://books.google.com/books?id=eS_...gbs_navlinks_s

    So if the capacitors are big, then I probably should use a 20k ohm resistor?
    Im new as well. I was told by my teachers at my trade school that the "proper" way is to use the resistor. However, the majority uses screwdrives. So thats what I do and I have no issues. Lets see what others use

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Chester County PA
    Posts
    386
    Think about what a resistor is and does. It's just resistance.
    Do you know why a start capacitor comes with a "bleed resistor" from the factory? Do you know why you should be extra careful if you come across a start capacitor that someone before you cut out the bleed resistor?

    You can discharge a capacitor by crossing up the two leads. A resistor will allow the energy to flow slower versus using a screwdriver. Slower is better when dealing with energy.

    I have never seen a Run Cap hold a charge after the circuit has been de-energized. Rest assured I still respect them and I'm treat them like a loaded gun.

    ~smoke~
    "That motor's done, he let the factory smoke charge out!"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
    Posts
    7,635
    screwdriver, wire strippers, needle nose, ...whatever is handy & insulated
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    1,840
    Quote Originally Posted by Epic_Win View Post
    This is probably a question you electricity-specialists will be able to answer best: I am curious to know whether I can use a fixed resister, one that is cheaper than those 20,000 ohm 5 watt resistors that sell for like $5 each:

    http://www.amazon.com/KOA-Speer-Thru...=2X4KV41DYHD7C

    http://www.amazon.com/KOA-Speer-Thru...=2X4KV41DYHD7C

    Can I really use a different resistor that can accomplish the same task safely, namely one with a higher resistance and lower wattage, or should I not press my luck? lol
    I would use a 4 watt resistor that is 20,001 ohms !!!!!!!! they are cheaper
    It is what it is unless I say differently !!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Central Va.
    Posts
    1,058
    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood650 View Post
    Lets see what others use
    My meter has a setting for checking microfarads, I use that. Usually you will test the capacitor (unless blown) anyway.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    1,801
    When I was green, I used a radio shack resistor, like the book says. Now, I use a screwdriver. I discharge every run cap, since I check them usually. The only one I have had arc on me was the one with power on!
    I never had a start cap arc, either, but most have the resistor built in.
    Jason

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Nebraska
    Posts
    34
    Anymore I don't even short them together. I just grab them and take the wires off. The only time I get hit by one is when I forget to turn off the power to the unit.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    nebraska
    Posts
    1,629
    AC's... I pull the disconnect and push in the contactor. Little 5-25 mfd on a psc blower motor gets shorted,after killing the power. My first meter had a fuse that would blow if the caps were not shorted before testing so I got in the habit a long time ago.

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