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  1. #14
    You can't contribute 15 degrees to the refrigerant type, no way. Don't believe it.

  2. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,120
    Originally posted by docholiday
    When I need to. Why, are you going to get Robo to buy us lunch?
    Now there's a good idea.
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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  3. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,120
    Originally posted by pyropaul
    Originally posted by beenthere
    Originally posted by special ed
    It's not 2010 anymore? I'm talking about when all mfg.'s will be required to make only R-410a capable systems, NOT complete R-22 phase-out.

    The 15 seer 410a's we put in, don't seem to blow out any warmer then the r22 13 seers at the same operating conditions.
    Why would they? Many people seem to confuse capacity with efficiency. SEER is a measure of efficiency: i.e. how much energy is required for a certain capacity? As SEER ratings increase, all it means is that less energy is required for a given output capacity. A 3 ton system is still a 3 ton system no matter if it is 10 SEER or 16 SEER and, given the same operating conditions, should put out (or take in depending if its heating or cooling) the same amount of heat and hence the same temperature rise (or fall). The energy used to provide that temperature rise/fall will be different though.

    Paul.

    just stating we put in both, and there is no real difference be cause of the gas, or eff rating.
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  4. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    9
    My 410a puts out heat that is very warm, close to that of my supplementary gas furnace, when the outside temperature is above 32F. Below that the output drops off quite a bit. I was told that the output is about 42K BTU at 35F and about 27K BTU at 20F. However, even at 10F there is heat. I do not know the number but I would guess that it is about 1/2 of 27K BTU. At 10F, my furnace cycles with the heat pump to maintain the desired room temperature. While the heat pump cannot do the job on its own, it still saves some heating costs.

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