I would like to strangle a restoration company
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Waco, Texas, USA
    Posts
    6,153
    Friend of mine had a massave water damage leak at his home. He had been gone for two weeks to find a supply water line serving the toilet broken spewing water like a fountain. You could have floated a boat in that house. TOTAL LOSS of building contents & sheetrock including the ceiling sheetrock, cabinets, etc.....

    A restoration company has removed the sheetrock and pretty much cleaned the place up & dried it out. They billed his insurance company for the work and my buddy also received a nice check for damages - he had great insurance by the way.

    He wanted me to take a look at the hvac system. The existing gas furnace up flow in a closet was gone as was the floor it sat on. The cooling coil was still there, supply plenum & flexible duct system. The refrigerant lines were butchered/torn in half and left open to the world....an no the service valves were NOT closed at the 042 3 yr. old Goodman outdoor unit. Drain line to the evap was BROKEN off, not cut. The flexible gas line was left dangling ...gas was not capped...gas stop at the appliances and at the meter were closed though. The flexible ducts were laying on the ceiling joists & sagging pretty bad as I looked up to view them. I pushed on the sagging parts and they were ALL full of water...bunches of it....Pwhewwww stunk too.

    Now my friend has signed the check over to the restoration company already.... He paid for clean up which was all done ok except for the a/c system. Now he has refrigerant oil & a duct system full of moisture. O yeah, did I mention the evap. was turned 90 in the closet so the access panel is facing the wall? Yeah, nice huh? So pretty much he is going to have to pay to remove this evap, plenum, & duct system when it should have been done and paid for by insurance.

    How are these restoration companies getting away with hiring hacks to remove these closet systems? Obviously it was done by grunts.

    I forgot to take my camera ......I am just sick about it too. I could really stirr up some trouble then
    "And remember my sentimental friend......that a heart is not judged by how much you love, but by how much you are loved by others" - Wizard of Oz.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Posts
    3,112
    Read the contract. What were they hired to do? It's all about the dollar. Contact the insurance company. Maybe they can blackball the restoration company from ever doing any work for them in the future. Remember, you aren't dealing with mechanical contractors. The workers will do what they are told. Give your name to the insurance company and offer your services as an inspector. Maybe help someone else in the future from running into the same problem your friend experienced. To bad he didn't call you earlier. Could have saved some heartache and misery.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Omaha, NE
    Posts
    309

    Safety tips (especially when out of town)

    I am sorry to hear your friends' story.

    I also know a friend that had the rubber hose feeding the washing machine burst when out of town. Neighbors notice water pouring out of Front door. Called Fire dept and the First Flr and Basement are totally damaged.

    I am a bit paranoid about water and these are my safety tips (easy to follow):

    1. When out of town, even for a day, turn the main water valve down (thw valve right after the meter):
    a. shut it completely
    b. shut it down to a trickle (so it can feed the icemaker for the fridge)

    2. EVERY 4-5 yrs, change ALL rubber hoses. Use ONLY stainless steel braided hoses for added protection (these hoses, if broken, will leak slowly and will NOT spray massive amount of water like the cheap rubber hose). These include:
    a. Washing machine hoses
    b. Hoses to toilet
    c. Hosee to all bathroom faucets (they are hidden underneath the cabinets and easy to forget)
    d. Hose to Dishwasher

    Considering how cheap these hoses are and they damage they can cause, it is good insurance.
    All the above can be changed for ($25-40; typical house with one DW, one washing machine and 3-4 bathrooms).

    I ONLY Use "Watts" brand (I am sure there are other reputable brands as well).

    http://www.watts.com/prod_images/hi-res/FS-2220BSS.jpg

    http://www.watts.com/prod_images/hi-res/FS-3820SSD.jpg


    BTW they just came out with this for Washing Machine:

    http://www.watts.com/pro/divisions/w...ntelliflow.htm

    cn


    Originally posted by Steve Wiggins
    Friend of mine had a massave water damage leak at his home. He had been gone for two weeks to find a supply water line serving the toilet broken spewing water like a fountain. You could have floated a boat in that house. TOTAL LOSS of building contents & sheetrock including the ceiling sheetrock, cabinets, etc.....

    A restoration company has removed the sheetrock and pretty much cleaned the place up & dried it out. They billed his insurance company for the work and my buddy also received a nice check for damages - he had great insurance by the way.

    He wanted me to take a look at the hvac system. The existing gas furnace up flow in a closet was gone as was the floor it sat on. The cooling coil was still there, supply plenum & flexible duct system. The refrigerant lines were butchered/torn in half and left open to the world....an no the service valves were NOT closed at the 042 3 yr. old Goodman outdoor unit. Drain line to the evap was BROKEN off, not cut. The flexible gas line was left dangling ...gas was not capped...gas stop at the appliances and at the meter were closed though. The flexible ducts were laying on the ceiling joists & sagging pretty bad as I looked up to view them. I pushed on the sagging parts and they were ALL full of water...bunches of it....Pwhewwww stunk too.

    Now my friend has signed the check over to the restoration company already.... He paid for clean up which was all done ok except for the a/c system. Now he has refrigerant oil & a duct system full of moisture. O yeah, did I mention the evap. was turned 90 in the closet so the access panel is facing the wall? Yeah, nice huh? So pretty much he is going to have to pay to remove this evap, plenum, & duct system when it should have been done and paid for by insurance.

    How are these restoration companies getting away with hiring hacks to remove these closet systems? Obviously it was done by grunts.

    I forgot to take my camera ......I am just sick about it too. I could really stirr up some trouble then

  4. #4
    Suggestion: For faucets, forget about replacing the hoses, even with the stainless type, there is still rubber on the inside.

    Just use 3/8" soft copper and comp. fittings. Very cheap and permanent.

    You can replace the toilet riser with a tube version also.

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