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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    258

    Trying to get heat from woodstove to rise in my split entry

    I have a nice sized wood burning stove in my gameroom, unfortunately if I get a good fire going it is too hot downstairs and I can't get enough to rise. So far I cut a hole in the floor directly above the stove and installed a grate, I also installed a ceiling fan in my livingroom which is directly above the gameroom where the stove is, and I added an induction fan in the grate above the stove.

    In my estimation, cold air is falling down the split entryway and trapping the heated air from rising, I hoped that the grate would have relieved the problem and promoted circulation and flow. I seem to get just enough heat to rise that it keeps my thermostat satisfied and therefore freezes the back bedrooms. I cut various lengths of thread and hung it from my doorway downstairs and it appears that the upper 18" of air is exiting the gameroom and the other 45" is entering the gameroom.

    Any suggestions?
    HotRod


    Controls..some days your a hero, some days your a zero. Direct acting since 1992.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    381
    Wood stove to big. Leave furnace blower on and install return air in game room. Not legal everywhere. Check with local building code.
    There is no bad beer, some just taste better than others.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    N.E. Indiana
    Posts
    879
    If you are talking about a grate the size of a typical floor grate (app. 4"x12") your grate is WAY too small.

    In old houses that burned wood, and the heat was transfered to the upstairs through large holes. The house I grew up in had them. The "well" "grate" or whatever you want to call them had a circular hole about 14" in diameter, with a decoritive ring around it upstairs and downstairs. The airflow was enough with the rise of heat alone, that it would move your hair if you stood over it.

  4. #4
    Agree with talktowags.
    The only way to get the heat into the whole house is using the furnace duct system. Just make sure not to de-pressurize the room with the stove in it too much that it smokes back.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    258
    I installed (2) grilles about 8 x 14 end to end in my bulkhead, that opens into the cold air return plenum, above that I have a heavy duty 8 x 12" grille. If you look up in the registers above the stove, I can see into my dining room. The thought was that the heat would get caught in the cold air cavity and could radiate up into the dining room or out of the cold air return grilles when the furnace wasn't running. When the furnace is running, or when I turn ON the circulating fan, the air draws thru my filter and electronic air cleaner. When I run a booster fan, it sits under the grille.
    HotRod


    Controls..some days your a hero, some days your a zero. Direct acting since 1992.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2001
    Location
    Southern NJ
    Posts
    1,241
    In the farm house I grew up in, the grate between floors was probably 2'x2' and depending on gravity is not going to be very efficient.

    In that farm house, we had a wood stove in the kitchen. The heat from the wood stove never reached the living room on the other side of the house, only one room away.

    We installed a return grill in the living room behind the TV ducted through the basement to a supply grill in the floor behind the wood stove. A draft inducer fan in the ductwork made a big difference. Moving air in one direction under the floor caused air to flow the other direction between rooms and it worked pretty good.
    Ryan
    Maintenance Guy
    -----------------
    naysayer, skeptic, conspiracy theorist

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    vancouver island canada
    Posts
    8
    In order to get warm air to the cold rooms, install a cold air return duct with a fan in it and run it back to the room where the stove is. Pumping cold air into that room will create positive pressure in the warm area and negative pressure in the cold area. voila! the heated air will flow to the lower pressure area.

    ryan

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