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  1. #1

    Walk-in coolers and beer coolers

    Hello everyone,

    I have a design where there is a walk in food cooler, walk in freezer and a walk in beer cooler.

    The CHWS/CHWR temps currently is at 44'F/55'F. We need to increase the supply to 60'F.

    Do I need a pump to do this. Also what other equipment do I need to increase this temperature.

    Can you also please direct me to schematic showing this arrangement.

    Thanks in advance for the help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    2,781
    What are your water pressures?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    Guayaquil EC
    Posts
    10,428
    Quote Originally Posted by JDHVAC View Post
    Hello everyone,

    I have a design where there is a walk in food cooler, walk in freezer and a walk in beer cooler.

    The CHWS/CHWR temps currently is at 44'F/55'F. We need to increase the supply to 60'F.

    Do I need a pump to do this. Also what other equipment do I need to increase this temperature.

    Can you also please direct me to schematic showing this arrangement.

    Thanks in advance for the help.
    Why do you need to increase the supply temperature to 60ºF?

    If your refrigeration condensing units are standard water-cooled models, they will be equipped with condenser water regulating valves which will throttle the flow to maintain proper condensing pressures.

    Am I missing something?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    2,781
    Quote Originally Posted by icemeister View Post
    Why do you need to increase the supply temperature to 60ºF?

    If your refrigeration condensing units are standard water-cooled models, they will be equipped with condenser water regulating valves which will throttle the flow to maintain proper condensing pressures.

    Am I missing something?
    This is true,but most of the time when chilled water is used to supply a condenser it is in a high rise,where the water pressure can be over 300psi.The Penn reg.valve and probably the condenser are not rated for that.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    258
    It would be the difference between supply and return chill water pressure that the Penn valve is concerned with. For energy consumption resons one wouldn't want that to be a very large difference. It should be well under what city water pressure dumped to drain would be and any Penn valve will handle that with ease.

    If it is really necessary to raise the loop temp to 60 degrees a 3-way mixing valve could be used. I see no need for one though. Frankly I run condensers off cooling tower water. The water treatment chemicals are more in line with what you need for the condenser to prevent scale.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Vancouver, WA
    Posts
    261
    Quote Originally Posted by coolperfect View Post
    This is true,but most of the time when chilled water is used to supply a condenser it is in a high rise,where the water pressure can be over 300psi.The Penn reg.valve and probably the condenser are not rated for that.
    Couldn't you use a pressure reducing valve to reduce the water pressure prior to the regulating valves and keep it within specs?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Augusta, ME
    Posts
    76
    yeah i have seen pressure reducing valves used for that very reason. then allow the penn valve to regulate head pressure and sc.

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