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Thread: Water treatment

  1. #1
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    Oct 2001
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    Water treatment

    What authority in HVAC industry sets standards for levels of chemicals needed to protect piping and equipment from corrosion, scale, and bacteria growth?

  2. #2
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    Any idea?

  3. #3
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    Aug 2008
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    Water testing and treatment is usually contracted out to a professional water chemistry business. You have to be certified to test and treat the water of the system. The amount and type of chemicals is determined by the test results of the water test. The Ph, TDS, and so forth is controlled within limits and the water test again to insure the chemicals are circulating Thur the system.

    This is beyond the experience of HVAC techs And left to a contractor. Some system are set up with a chemical injection system that injects the proper amount of chemicals with whatever time it is determined to inject the chemicals. You can find the required limit's for the equipment like cooling towers and other equipment if your interested in those requirements. The water testing company will provide the test results of the loop's and everything that requirement.

  4. #4
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    Oct 2001
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    Hardwater, thank you for replying.
    Let me rephrase my question. If there are three different water treatment companies and they all have different limits. Which company is right? For example: Years ago WTC had limits for nitrite in closed loop between 800 and 1000 ppm. Now new WTC wants to maintain 400 to 600 ppm. The loops are the same. The water temperatures are the same. So why should I believe one company over the other?

  5. #5
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    Aug 2008
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    Probably the reason for the lower nitrite level is to meet new EPA Limits for the acceptable level of nitrites allowed in the water since its considered a hazard. usually the nitrites is used as an oxygen scavenger.

    Water treatment company's all use different chemicals to treat to maintain the some different levels but they all must conform to EPA standards. For instance where I work we had one company that used sodium hydroxide for PH control which what I was always use to using.

    Then a different company was contracted and they liked to use potassium hydroxide for control of PH. I didn't like this at first until I did a little more research and discover that the potassium hydroxide was fine it just contained copper.

    Once again the HAVC industry doesn't establish the chemical limits sorry that's just the way it is.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hardwater View Post
    Once again the HAVC industry doesn't establish the chemical limits sorry that's just the way it is.

    So the question still remains. Who does? I don't believe that it is EPA.

  7. #7
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    There aren't really any regulations over water chemistry... I also don't know what Hardwater means by 'You have to be certified to test and treat the water of the system.' What certification/agency are you talking about? Ultimately, it's the coupon rack that is the most important guideline for your system.

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