Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    6

    New to the trade

    Hello HVAC-Talk Users,

    I just wanted to stop in and introduce myself.

    I am 24 years old and 14 months ago after years of factory work and dead end jobs I made the choice to go back to school for a second career. My schooling lasted 13 months and focused on a lot of theory, but also had 1 day per week of hands on training with furnaces, wiring, threading pipe, installing and troubleshooting gas appliances etc. I obtained by G2 Gas Technicians license (Ontario) and just recently was given a formal job offer by an HVAC company after several interviews, a background check etc.

    I was hired on as an "Install Helper(furnaces mostly)" and I start my general training tomorrow through Friday before being paired with a guy and going out into the field next week. I am a little nervous to say the least reading and hearing some of the opinions that are held by the older veterans of the trades on us new guys who are green behind the ears. I hope through lots of hard work and dedication I can learn and progress in the company I now work for and become a valued team member to them.

    If anyone has any tips of advice for someone walking into a job in the HVAC field with no prior experience I would love to hear it.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    11
    Hey there,

    I was once new to the field as well (10years ago), with no prior experience.

    Things I would suggest for you as a helper/apprentice-

    *Always arrive to work on time

    *Get familiar with your tools and how to use them properly

    *If there is a task that you know you can perform, always ask your partner to let you perform it (with his supervision if you are not 100%)... it will get you much needed experience and show your co-workers and your employer what you're made of. It also avoids call-backs from customers

    *Always do your jobs and tasks correctly, do not cut corners. What's the point of doing something and not doing it right? "Do it once and do it right" has always worked for me. Sure, sometimes it will take a little longer to finish a job... but at least you can go home at the end of the day and not have to worry or second guess any work you performed.

    *Don't be afraid to ask questions! Don't pretend to know something... A lot of people "know" how things work, but do not necessarily "understand" how things work

    Hopefully you will be working with a tech that is helpful and knowledgeable and can show you the ropes. Hope my advice helps you

    Good luck to you!

    LPK
    Last edited by LPK; 11-08-2011 at 06:00 PM. Reason: type-o

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for the support and advice.

    I have always been professional in every job that I have ever worked(Show up on time, in uniform, ready to work, troubles at the door, etc) so I do not think their will be any problems on that front.

    I am fairly proficient with most tools and already have my own bag assembled from what the company owner told me I would need. He stated that as I go along I will need to get other items but not to worry to much about it at the moment.

    I appreciate your advice, it has calmed my nerves a little as I am the kind of person to always ask questions, never pretend to know more then I do, and I am very eager to learn and understand what is going on.

    Fear of the unknown I guess is the biggest factor. I have never held a job in this industry so I am not sure what is expected of me or what they think I should be proficient with at this time.

    The owner told me that the gentleman I am being paired with is a little rough around the edges but is a very smart and knowledgeable guy and not to happy at the moment. His current partner (new hire) is not working out I was told so he is frustrated to say the least(hope this does not get projected upon me). I was told to listen, do what he says to do how he says to do it and do not touch or even think about using ANY of his tools lol.

    Thanks for the encouragement and advice.

    Canadian87

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    11
    You shouldn't be nervous... be excited!

    I've worked with my fare share of "rough around the edges" type of guys, people like this can certainly be pains in the you know what! But if it is someone smart and knowledgeable that you can learn a lot from, it will be a good thing.

    Lol about his tools! And you're welcome.

    LPK

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    6
    It is a mash of excited nervousness, I am excited at the prospect of starting a new career and working my way up the ladder with a company that is reputable and offers a lot of room for advancement.

    I get along with most people so I do not think their will be much of a problem, especially if he is as eager to teach as I am to learn.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ontario Canada
    Posts
    1,341
    Welcome EH!
    Make sure you take advantage of the governments apprenticeship program and get the tool grant... *up to $5000.00.
    Listen to the Person who is teaching you but, always think for yourself. You may have a better idea. A good teacher will listen too you.
    Good luck.
    Never give up; Never surrender!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    6
    Thanks for the welcome Trouble Time, good to see a fellow Canadian

    I have spent a few hundred dollars of my own money over the last year on tools that I knew I would need, but have saved off on some of the items I would need as a tech as that will not come until years down the road.

    Are the tool grants only for those who are being taken on as an apprentice? I did not hear any mention of apprenticeship from my current employer at this time, so I assume I am just coming on as a regular employee. The job posting required no experience but obviously having my G2 ticket gave me a leg up and shows that I have the initiative to learn and can eventually activate furnaces and move fairly smoothly(legality wise) into a lead install position years down the road.

    Thanks for the advice as well,

    Cheers

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by trouble time View Post
    Welcome EH!
    Make sure you take advantage of the governments apprenticeship program and get the tool grant... *up to $5000.00.
    $5000??? That's nuts! We get nothing of the kind down here.. but good for you guys!


    Quote Originally Posted by trouble time View Post
    Listen to the Person who is teaching you but, always think for yourself. You may have a better idea. A good teacher will listen too you.
    Good luck.
    This is excellent advice! Can't believe I left it out myself as I used to and still do it all the time. Kudos to you trouble time!

    LPK

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    SouthEast NC ICW & Piedmont Foothills
    Posts
    7,635
    being "Gruppy" most of the time, I have never cared for someone using my tools ( the concern is if they break them) without being asked.

    show a willingness to learn, ask questions, if you don't understand ask again; until you do understand.

    you're not a doormat, don't take a bunch of shiat from anyone (you have to make the judgement)

    nobody wants to baby sit....
    It`s better to be silent and thought the fool; than speak and remove all doubt.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    6
    I understand his/your concern about lending out tools and letting others use them completely, what made me laugh was the way the owner went about telling me that he does not like others using/touching his tools.

    You guys have made me a little more confident as most of the advice and information you are so generously sharing with me fall into line with my personality and character. I am new to this trade but not the learning process. I am a well known and respected teacher on a few other web forums in regards to one of my hobbies and I think being able to teach and share ideas clearly with others plays a big factor in learning.

    I appreciate the kind words and tips guys, has calmed my tendency to over think things.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    6
    Just finished up my second 13 hour day at the new job. I was sent out both days to "observe" installs. I am getting along with everyone well, asking a lot of questions and helping out when I can. The guys are making me feel like part of the team and I am learning lots.

    I have yet to be paired with my permanent partner(that happens Monday) but I think everything should work out fine.

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