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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,927
    It is fine up to a point,but no further.Who is to say what that point is ? http://www.what?

    Without going in details ,suffice it to say that every persons needs are different. It seems you could benefit by learning that.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    626
    No jacob, the real problem is you don't understand ventilation. Homes built without mechanical ventilation depend on the amount of "holes" in the home and the amount of temperature difference and wind. In the winter, in colder climates, you have too much ventilation, which produces comfort problems and higher utility bills. In warm climates, in the summer, humidity problems and higher bills take place. In moderate temps. and low wind conditions such as spring of fall, all homes are underventilated because there is no driving force. The other problem in dry dusty conditions, like in Oklahoma, is the "holes" of the home let in dust, dirt and pollen.

    If one seals the home tightly and brings air through a dampered duct, through a good high MERV filter into the return of the air handler, controlled by an electronic device called an Aircycler, and distributed said air evenly through out the home, that person can then program how much fresh FILTERED air is introduced into the home. This can be done for $300.00 . I know because I have done it. Let me ask you this: who does not want better, cleaner air in the home? Who does not want lower utility bills? Who does not want more comfort in the home? the answer is NO ONE

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,927
    Originally posted by uktra
    In moderate temps. and low wind conditions such as spring of fall, all homes are underventilated because there is no driving force.
    You mean the driving force that tells oneself to open a window ... (instead of letting the auto change-over stat maintain a constant temperture by going from cool to heat to cool to heat.)

    Again ,you dont seem to understand what I said, or just want to make argument...good luck with that

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    626
    Again you don't understand ventillation. Opening windows does not ventilation make. You can open all the windows you want, and if there is no temp. difference and no wind, there is no ventilation. And again, in humiod climates you let in humidity, dirt, pollen, ect. In dry climates, dust and pollen. You have not answered the questions I have asked--name who would not want these benefits in a home. Who here is really arguing for the sake of argument?

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    25

    introducing fresh air

    I will never say i am toolazy to open a window.
    However, assuming allergy problems are minimal,
    it would be nice to filter the air before it comes
    in versus allowing the hvac to do it, esp. if it
    will cost more... basically, air must be exchanged
    or inroduced to the living space. Next, humidity must
    be controlled. Last, air (for me) should be filtered
    to some degree (I choose very good vs. excellent) as no
    member of my family is hyper-sensitive to any allergens
    known at this time...
    I would like to know what 300$ system you are referring
    to, even if it is a "plug". I had been considering a
    Ultrair thermastor? or something or another. I wrote it down but it escapes my mind at the moment. sounds right.
    I believe it will HEPA filter the air, and that, in addition to perm. washable air filters for hvac system
    should be sufficient. (seems as if we have moved this thread to air quality thread level...)
    Due to the closed cell spray foam, nominal amounts of
    doors and windows, etc. I just want to ensure that the
    air quality inside is adequate for the size of the home, 2160 sq ft. thanks again, dave

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    626
    It's not a question of being too lazy to open windows. As I said before opening windows may do no good and can present problems. The real key here is do you want to control ventilation properly or do you want Mother Nature to TRY to control ventilation? There are many ways to mechanically ventilate. Thermastor Ultra Aire is a very good product which I have used in my designing of properly ventillated homes. There are many ways to mechanically ventilate homes, each with different cost/RIO factors. It depends on your climate, but the key point I am trying to make, is that ALL homes should be built tight and mechanically ventilated. The system I use for moderate and warm humid climates is the aircycler product mentioned in the other thread. You can find information at http://www.aircycler.com as well as http://www.buildingscience.com.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    25

    Urgent help needed again!!!

    Now I must say thanks. i was linked to GWWSI, or
    a building science-designer-inspector who will
    for a fee make sure this project goes off well
    I found the site once, but was glad to re visit
    after the recommendation made here. They will make
    visits, check progress before and after various
    stages of construction, and since i am 4 hrs away
    by plane, I couldn't be happier.

    Now, my builder says that he trusts the install
    of a particular company a great deal, and they
    stand behind/warranty their work very well also.
    I can choose Trane, Carrier or Luxaire, and he
    recommends upgrading seer level, use of air
    exchanger, etc.

    My fear is that he is not comfortable sealing off the attic.
    What should I do? He makes a valid argument about
    ventilation, and is concerned about moisture build up
    in attic space. I also was concerned, but after educating myself more and more I do not feel as nervous about it. Using the foam insulation should prevent (not guarantee) moisture condensation if 5-6 inches of foam is used (especially if it is closed cell) Any comments?

    Last, the price to use closed cell (insulstar or comfort foam) is 60% higher roughly than open cell icynene. Should I use closed cell on attic and 1.5" open cell on walls with batt insulation added after wards to reduce cost? The price is skyrocketing, after some interior wall insulation is done to reduce noise. I guess I could go with blown in cellulose for interior walls to reduce costs...
    here is the plan, but flipped, faces south..
    home plan:

    http://www.billgperry.com/images/7622r.jpg

    A million thanks..

    dave

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    626
    What stage are you in in the process of your new home?

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    25
    we are at the foundation stage. I requested the foundation
    be insulated from the stem wall.? Honestly, this was
    a recommendation made to me, and I have no idea what it
    means. anyway, I asked my builder to have it done.
    Why do you ask? Any great ideas escape me?
    gracias uktra

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    what is a stem wall?
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    25
    "Did you insulate your slab from your stem wall? This is primary in this climate and is not a general construction practice." (Oklahoma)

    This is what my recommendation was.

    On a side note, Is this speculation correct, regarding my last post about moisture in attic?

    If the ducting in the attic is in a conditioned, unvented area, moisture could build up in here due to leaks (possible leaks) of ductwork since the unit also serves as a dehumidifier? Or is this a novice attempt on my part to guess where the potential problems lie?

    I wonder if my builder is sitting on the sideline of caution, since a. foam insulation is not very common there
    b. moisture is a concern
    c. HVAC pros are not very knowledgeable
    d. potential of unhappy homeowner if
    something goes wrong
    I really like my builder, as he has answered everything clearly, completely, and has tremendous credentials...
    I feel that he will not steer my wrong. At the same time,
    I feel that a conditioned attic is the way to go..
    And the clock is ticking..........
    How come I can not find any specs on carrier heat pump systems online? their site is awful in this regards..Trane site was much more detailed with specs..

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    626
    Are you slab on grade, basement, or do you have a crawl? Are you one story above foundation, or two?

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    25
    no basement, no crawl just flat cement foundation-
    There, they pour the mud (concrete) differently
    than they do here in California.

    Thus, when it was recommended to insulate the slab
    from stem wall (again, I do not know well what this
    means yet) i figured it must be a geografical thing.
    Here, I had never heard of that...

    This was in regards to insulation and I do not know
    if it matters when doing the load calcs.
    I haven't done it yet...
    -dave

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