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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    136

    Thermocouple lube

    While doing the preseason PM on a unit heater in a water plant today, I had some difficulty removing the thermocouple and pilot line nuts. It appeared to be a dissimiliar metal/high humidity caused problem. I've had the same problem in damp basements. While cleaning the burner tubes, I had time to think (Bad thing to do). What, if anything could/should be used to lube threads? Just thought I'd toss this out and see if anyone has any suggestions, other than remove the moisture source, which in most cases is beyond our control. John

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Atlanta,GA.
    Posts
    926
    dielectric grease or be very careful with anti-seize

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    746
    Anti-seize is best, but I'm in the habit of putting a single drop of Zoom Spout oil on pilot line fittings and that seems to help a lot.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cal
    Posts
    1,596
    Baso sells a high temp graphite grease for valves and pilot break nuts. It makes the pilot tube connections SO much more easy to deal with.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    N.E. Ohio
    Posts
    136
    Thanks for the input. My first thought was dielectric grease on the thermocouple. I used the zoom-spout on the pilot line, but wasn't sure if oil would mess with the conductivity of the TC. John

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    746
    Oil or anything else on the pilot line will have no effect whatsoever on the thermocouple, all of the thermocouple voltage is in the thermocouple copper. A tiny amount of oil or anything else on the thermocouple nut threads will have no effect on the thermocouple either.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    greenville , sc
    Posts
    718
    Quote Originally Posted by tinnerjohn View Post
    While doing the preseason PM on a unit heater in a water plant today, I had some difficulty removing the thermocouple and pilot line nuts. It appeared to be a dissimiliar metal/high humidity caused problem. I've had the same problem in damp basements. While cleaning the burner tubes, I had time to think (Bad thing to do). What, if anything could/should be used to lube threads? Just thought I'd toss this out and see if anyone has any suggestions, other than remove the moisture source, which in most cases is beyond our control. John
    graphite powder. you can put it in a pen, similar to a oiling pen. graphite between metals never goes away or wears-out.
    catch a man a fish , feed him for a day.
    teach a man to fish , ruin a good business opportunity.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    in a house, Appomattox, Va.
    Posts
    3,427
    I would have said petroleum jelly or plumbers grease.

    I use antiseize on lots of stuff- condensor and blower motor shafts, bolts on oil burners and furnaces, tried some on the cleanout caps on a furnace yesterday (we'll see next yr or too if they come off cleanly).

    Have used no-ox on wire nuts for low voltage on outdoor units. I notice some of the manufacturers now supply grey wirenuts with gell inside them.
    Col 3:23


    questions asked, answers received, ignorance abated

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Houston area
    Posts
    1,493
    Quote Originally Posted by billygoat22 View Post
    Have used no-ox on wire nuts for low voltage on outdoor units. I notice some of the manufacturers now supply grey wirenuts with gell inside them.
    Those wirenuts are readily available at Home Depot or Lowes. I have never used the powdered graphite on a thermocouple but it sounds like a good idea. Just be careful, it's messy as all get out. It turns anything you get it on black including hands, clothes, carpet etc...
    The picture in my avatar is of the Houston Ship Channel and was taken from my backyard. I like to sit outside and slap mosquitos while watching countless supertankers, barges and cargo ships of every shape and size carry all sorts of deadly toxins to and fro. It's really beautiful at times.....just don't eat the three eyed fish....

    `. .` .>(((>

    `... `. .` .>(((>

    .` .>(((>

    LMAOSHMSFOAIDMT

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