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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    170

    WIll heat pump work in NJ?

    Reading heat pumps are mostly for places with mild winters. Need inputs from pros. Also, what alternatives which are less on utility bills work over and above the standard gas fired furnace, except geo.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Waffleville
    Posts
    10,339
    It is possible to have a heat pump and a gas furnace. When the temps get down where the hear pump cannot keep up, the system will automatically switch to the gas furnace. This is called dual fuel or hybrid heat in the industry.

    A load calculation will need to be performed on the building and then the size of heat pump and electric heaters can be determined. With that information you can calculate the cost of kw versus the cost of a therm and determine which way would be more efficient, a furnace or an electric heat pump. And a dual fuel system can expand on the efficiency over just a furnace alone.
    If Guns Kill People, Do Pencils Misspell Words?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An2a1...eature=related

    Before we work on artificial intelligence why don't we do something about natural stupidity?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,936
    Heat pumps are great for NJ. I just installed a heat pump in the house I bought recently in Lancaster, PA. Tore out the oil boiler and am looking forward to paying less then half as much to heat my house this winter.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    170
    Isn't electric heat always costlier than gas based heating? Sorry, but I don't understand why someone will augment a gas based heating with electric heating with electric heat being stage 1 and on extreme cold auto switching gas heating. Please forgive me for asking this, but need to understand the concept. Also, is it possible to add an electric heat pump to an EXISTING gas based heating HVAC?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,060

    Angry Heat pumps

    Quote Originally Posted by wisepole View Post
    Isn't electric heat always costlier than gas based heating? Sorry, but I don't understand why someone will augment a gas based heating with electric heating with electric heat being stage 1 and on extreme cold auto switching gas heating. Please forgive me for asking this, but need to understand the concept. Also, is it possible to add an electric heat pump to an EXISTING gas based heating HVAC?
    will extract heat from the ambient air quite well if sized and installed properly.

    At the balance point of your house, "btu's of heat loss at design temperature" the furnace will take over. It is possible to ad an hp instead of ac.
    Last edited by second opinion; 10-11-2011 at 03:16 PM. Reason: not sure how to remove grumpy face???

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Albuquerque NM
    Posts
    2,485
    Quote Originally Posted by wisepole View Post
    Isn't electric heat always costlier than gas based heating? Sorry, but I don't understand why someone will augment a gas based heating with electric heating with electric heat being stage 1 and on extreme cold auto switching gas heating. Please forgive me for asking this, but need to understand the concept. Also, is it possible to add an electric heat pump to an EXISTING gas based heating HVAC?
    You're confusing "electric heating" with heat pump heating. They're not the same, though a heat pump does run on electricity!

    wisepole, you're not wise yet, keep reading ...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    68,936
    Quote Originally Posted by wisepole View Post
    Isn't electric heat always costlier than gas based heating? Sorry, but I don't understand why someone will augment a gas based heating with electric heating with electric heat being stage 1 and on extreme cold auto switching gas heating. Please forgive me for asking this, but need to understand the concept. Also, is it possible to add an electric heat pump to an EXISTING gas based heating HVAC?
    While a heat pump is electric, it provides more heat for the money then most fossil fuels do.
    Government is a disease...
    ...masquerading as its own cure…
    Ecclesiastes 10:2 NIV


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Waffleville
    Posts
    10,339
    Am guessing I didn't give a good explanation. I'll leave it alone, am sure someone will be by to help clarify
    If Guns Kill People, Do Pencils Misspell Words?

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=An2a1...eature=related

    Before we work on artificial intelligence why don't we do something about natural stupidity?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
    Posts
    798
    A heat pump will work fine in new jersey. Just make sure the manual J your contractor takes your heating load requirements pertaining to your area into consideration.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    67,897
    They work fine in PA, so no reason they won't work as well in NJ.
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    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Suppy NC
    Posts
    4,513
    heat pumps work well in NJ
    being from jersey and servicing them alone the ocean for many years the only complaint was when the strip heaters kicked in the bill would go way up
    had a heatpump with oil backup in my house and it saved me a fortune in oil cost
    was set to 30 degrees then the oil furnace would kick on and the pump would shut off/
    a hp is 450 percent eff at i believe 40 degrees and will give enough heat and comfor down to the balance point of your house also will work well with gass backup
    my electric bill was about 120 for the month of janurary the coldest and was only useing 5galons of oil a week
    average temp for central jersey is 40 degrees

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    644
    Quote Originally Posted by wisepole View Post
    Isn't electric heat always costlier than gas based heating? Sorry, but I don't understand why someone will augment a gas based heating with electric heating with electric heat being stage 1 and on extreme cold auto switching gas heating. Please forgive me for asking this, but need to understand the concept. Also, is it possible to add an electric heat pump to an EXISTING gas based heating HVAC?
    electric resistance heat can only give you maximum 1 unit of energy out for every one in. A heat pump will give you 2.5 to 3.8 or so units of energy out for every one in depending on conditions and efficiency of the unit. Gas heat will give you anywhere from .75 to .95 or so units of energy out per unit in depending on the furnace. So you have to compare those efficiency numbers to the cost of the energy per btu. This will vary by location as well as whether or not you use gas for other things or just for heating. You have to take into account the whole cost and not just the cost per unit of energy (monthly service fees to have gas connected, etc.).

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,204
    Quote Originally Posted by beachtech View Post
    It is possible to have a heat pump and a gas furnace. When the temps get down where the hear pump cannot keep up, the system will automatically switch to the gas furnace. This is called dual fuel or hybrid heat in the industry.

    A load calculation will need to be performed on the building and then the size of heat pump and electric heaters can be determined. With that information you can calculate the cost of kw versus the cost of a therm and determine which way would be more efficient, a furnace or an electric heat pump. And a dual fuel system can expand on the efficiency over just a furnace alone.
    With a Heat Pump/Gas system why are heat strips even needed at all?

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