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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    10
    I live in Pennsylvania. I have a 2400sq. ft. two store house with natural gas hot water baseboard heat. The price of natural gas is getting out of hand......so I'm looking into a different heat source.

    Can anyone tell me if Geothermal will work with hot water baseboard heat?

    Any info would be appreciated.

    Thanks Shawn

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    The water will not be hot enough, would need the entire perimeter of home to be high output runtal type of rads.

    It is more suitable for radiant floor heating.
    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    10
    Thanks for the response.....

    Questions.....

    How hot will/can Geothermal heat water?

    WhenI read that a Geothermal heat exchanger is 300% efficient...what does that mean?

    Thanks Shawn

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Posts
    11,808
    To heat domestic hot water with a desuperheater, the heat pump could slowly get the water quite hot, but for an output to rads I think it will be really struggling to get much more than 120F. Better for radiant floor heat.

    By 300% efficient, think of it compared to electric heat.

    Suppose it could deliver 15 kW of heat, it would get 10 kW from the earth for free and 5 kW would come from the electric power that runs the compressor. You only pay for 1/3 of the heat delivered.

    15 kW is about 51,195 Btu/hr. For your boiler to give you that amount of heat, the amount of gas the boiler would burn would depend upon how efficient it is. As a best case, if your boiler was 80% efficient it would burn 51,195/0.8= 64,000 Btu worth of gas each hour on this comparison.

    So in your area, if 0.64 'therms' of natural gas is more expensive than 5 kWh of electric power, a heat pump may be an economical way to go, but you would most likely have the added expense of converting to forced air heat. Another benefit of the forced air is you would have air conditioning too. If your basement is all finished off, that probably will never happen.

    The way we build has a greater impact on our comfort, energy consumption and IAQ than any HVAC system we install.

    http://www.ductstrap.com/

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    10
    Thanks Carnak

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