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  1. #1

    New top feed tank problems

    Hello Everybody,
    This is my first post and I am going to jump right into it!
    I am hoping that somebody can help me. I recently replaced my outdoor furnace oil tank. I installed a fiberglass 909 liter tank. It was installed with a 1/2" single copperline. It is a top feed installation. The tank is situated on a cement stand approximately 5 feet above ground. The furnace is located in the basement of the house. Ever since the installation I have had to bleed the furnace line at least once a day because the furnace keeps quiting.
    Can anybody help me understand what i need to do?I shouldnt have to bleed it everyday!
    Thanks In advance.

  2. #2
    Hey,
    I should add some more details I suppose, it is a single line system(no return line) and the furnace is actually a new yorker boiler that provides base board heating and hot domestic water, it is a reillo(spelled correctly?) burner.
    If more info on the system is needed let me know.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Waffleville
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    10,339
    Need to have the installing contractor come back out and recheck everything for you. It sounds as though there is a leak somewhere causing the system yo lose its prime.
    If Guns Kill People, Do Pencils Misspell Words?

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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    Riellos can on occasion have problems with losing prime, I've seen it with overhead lines, if there is no loose connection on the oil line you might have to have a tiger loop installed.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlstark View Post
    Riellos can on occasion have problems with losing prime, I've seen it with overhead lines, if there is no loose connection on the oil line you might have to have a tiger loop installed.
    putting a check valve in the line closer to the furnace will do the same thing.

    is it a top feed or bottom feed tank? id have trouble believing a downward graded oil line would lose prime even with a leak.

    Have your contractor do a vacuum test on the lines, itll tell him all he needs to know.

    if he doesnt know how, get a new contractor

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
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    4,900
    I agree find the leak, I would add a Tiger loop also

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    S.E.,PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by catmanacman View Post
    I agree find the leak, I would add a Tiger loop also

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
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    4,900
    I also prefer the gar-ber oil filter as they seam to seal better

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
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    799
    Quote Originally Posted by catmanacman View Post
    I also prefer the gar-ber oil filter as they seam to seal better
    And they actually filter. Tiger loops mask problems, not solve them.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Massachusetts
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    6,841
    Quote Originally Posted by Gross View Post
    putting a check valve in the line closer to the furnace will do the same thing.

    is it a top feed or bottom feed tank? id have trouble believing a downward graded oil line would lose prime even with a leak.

    Have your contractor do a vacuum test on the lines, itll tell him all he needs to know.

    if he doesnt know how, get a new contractor
    A check valve and a Tiger Loop perform two entirely different functions. The very tiniest of air leaks (air can leak where oil will not due to density differences) can confound the most determined technician. You can drive yourself crazy hunting for the ghost or simply install a Tiger Loop and put the whole issue to rest. Our company learned many years ago that whenever we install a suction application, we automatically install a Tiger Loop. I've spent many dark, cold nights at home with the wife when I otherwise could have been chasing air leaks, thanks to the Tiger Loop.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Eastern Shore, MD
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    799
    Quote Originally Posted by skippedover View Post
    A check valve and a Tiger Loop perform two entirely different functions. The very tiniest of air leaks (air can leak where oil will not due to density differences) can confound the most determined technician. You can drive yourself crazy hunting for the ghost or simply install a Tiger Loop and put the whole issue to rest. Our company learned many years ago that whenever we install a suction application, we automatically install a Tiger Loop. I've spent many dark, cold nights at home with the wife when I otherwise could have been chasing air leaks, thanks to the Tiger Loop.
    See below

  12. #12
    First of all thanks everyone for the replies,

    Calling the contractor back to recheck it is not an option. I called him allready, he said since the insurance agent signed off on the installation and the furnace was functioning properly when he left his job is complete. He has washed his hands of the job.
    It is a top feed out of the tank total vertical distance from the top of the tank to the burner is approximately 9 feet. Total length of installed copper line is 37 feet.
    I spoke briefly to a burner tech today who is coming out this week to inspect the installation, he mentioned that on a reillo burner, if the oil filter is dirty or sludged up it could cause my problem. Is it possible that after mucking about with the oil( old oil was transfered into the new tank) that some sludge was stirred up and now the filter is the culprit?

    Any comments are appreciated

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    702
    Quote Originally Posted by skippedover View Post
    A check valve and a Tiger Loop perform two entirely different functions. The very tiniest of air leaks (air can leak where oil will not due to density differences) can confound the most determined technician. You can drive yourself crazy hunting for the ghost or simply install a Tiger Loop and put the whole issue to rest. Our company learned many years ago that whenever we install a suction application, we automatically install a Tiger Loop. I've spent many dark, cold nights at home with the wife when I otherwise could have been chasing air leaks, thanks to the Tiger Loop.
    You're 100% correct Skipped, several occasions I've run into Riellos with overhead lines, we add a tiger loop and never get a call back.

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