Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 31
  1. #1

    Cool Static Pressure.

    One of the measurements I make during Heat inspections is that of static pressure. The ideal static measure is: l 0.5l inches of water. So in a balanced return vs. supply it should be: l-0.25l + l+0.25l=l0.5l or simply 0.5 in wg. But this is rare if ever. Most of the time the return will be significantly higher than the supply. (-0.4/+0.1). Or since that heat is run at a lower speed the sum is significantly less than 0.5 in wg (-0.2/+0.07). Then on rare occasions I will get readings in the opposite extremes (-0.15/+0.4).
    I would appreciate feed back for the following:
    1.What diagnostic can be made from these example readings.
    2. What potential equipment damage can result if left unaltered.
    3. How would the supply and return be altered to change these readings to meet the ideal ranges.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    southern california
    Posts
    535
    I am not sure where you get that the ideal pressure is 0.5. All fans have a fan curve that compares static, cfm, and hp. The ideal static would be when the fan is operating at its most efficient point delivering the required airflow and not exceeding the rated hp.Furnaces should be checked for heat rise, blower amperes against nameplate ratings. If the recorded results are within specifications then the actual static will be inside the rating of the blower.Excessive static is usually caused by filter and evaporator coil maintenance or design problems associated with poor duct design.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,308
    As the wizard said, .5" is not the ideal. Some air handlers are rated at .3"wg.

    Fitting loss readings are sometimes required to make a decision on which alterations will make the most improvement in air flow.
    Contractor locator map

    How-to-apply-for-Professional

    How many times must one fix something before it is fixed?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Galveston Texas
    Posts
    530
    The unit itself usually has a static pressure number on it and as wizard and beenthere have said it's not always .5. Also in the units manuals and such there is an airflow data chart which shows you based on the fan being one speed and the ESP being x then your getting x amount of cfm. If that number ends up being less then what the unit is rated for then you'll need to make adjustments accordingly.

  5. #5
    0.5 in wc is from an inspection template given to me by my company. The comparison the temp and IFM amp to the name plate is something I also do.

    So the blower wheel static rating is posted on the blower itself?
    Thanks for the feedback.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,367
    Are you taking the supply reading before or after the A/C coil?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,060

    You are on the right track

    Quote Originally Posted by GarnetJax View Post
    0.5 in wc is from an inspection template given to me by my company. The comparison the temp and IFM amp to the name plate is something I also do.

    So the blower wheel static rating is posted on the blower itself?
    Thanks for the feedback.
    the 0.5 on the furnace name plate is the design static pressure, the 0.3 on the air handler includes the evaporator coil. Most coils have around 0.2 to 0.3 that needs to be subtracted from the furnace 0.5

    Not all gas furnaces will have a coil added to the system.

    A fan curve chart is supplied showing the selected fan motor, fan cfm, and at what pressure drop, or static pressure.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    229
    Static pressure is something my trade school didn't go over as much I thought they would have. I have similar issues with SP as the OP. Anyone have any good info on SP that i can read up on? My work requires I check it on all calls, and I would like to know alot more about static pressure then I actually do...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,060

    Look in the educational section

    Quote Originally Posted by Redwood650 View Post
    Static pressure is something my trade school didn't go over as much I thought they would have. I have similar issues with SP as the OP. Anyone have any good info on SP that i can read up on? My work requires I check it on all calls, and I would like to know alot more about static pressure then I actually do...
    for some help. Unfortunately most trade schools do not teach what students need to know.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    13
    I tried to answer this but timed out due to there being so darned many things to say about ESP, TSP and design.
    .5 ESP is a middle of the road number. A decent duct design and a fairly well matched ahu/furnace running adequate CFM will typically fall into this area.
    Less ESP at equal CFM means the blower is working less, might last longer and will use less energy. Saving money on duct design and construction will always spend it on electricity and fuel. Always.
    Too much return pressure can be from dirty filters or filters of higher than normal efficiency. Restricted return registers or dirt and corrosion in the ductwork.
    Too much supply pressure is usually a design problem. Too much flex duct. Too long a run. Too many turns.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Southeast michigan
    Posts
    93
    All equipment has it's own tesp....don't just go by what your company says go by the rating on the furnace.... And you should take it before the coil on a furnace

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,576
    Quote Originally Posted by Desuperheater View Post
    I tried to answer this but timed out due to there being so darned many things to say about ESP, TSP and design.
    .5 ESP is a middle of the road number. A decent duct design and a fairly well matched ahu/furnace running adequate CFM will typically fall into this area.
    Less ESP at equal CFM means the blower is working less, might last longer and will use less energy. Saving money on duct design and construction will always spend it on electricity and fuel. Always.
    Too much return pressure can be from dirty filters or filters of higher than normal efficiency. Restricted return registers or dirt and corrosion in the ductwork.
    Too much supply pressure is usually a design problem. Too much flex duct. Too long a run. Too many turns.
    Ducts can be too large. Consider heat gain in a nonconditioned space. Heat gain increases with duct surface area and with slower moving air. You could easily lose more energy than what you save by oversizing ducts.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    229
    I have also been told to check SP without involving the evap coil. Meaning for example, an upflow furnace with the blower on the bottom and the coil above, you would check SP at the bottom, and just before the evap. Is that true? Every tech I have rode with has check after the evap coil and they claim that is how you can also tell of the coil is dirty...

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event