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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    7

    Ducted supply air to Clothes Dryer?

    I'm designing an extremely well-insulated, airtight, net-zero energy house and our clients are really wanting a conventional clothes dryer inside the house (we usually try to push a condensing dryer, drying closet, or put the dryer outside the conditioned envelope).

    I'm wondering if it's feasible to have dedicated outdoor supply air ducted directly to an electric clothes dryer. Does anyone have any experience with such an installation? I'm particularly concerned with whether or not most dryers make this possible by virtue of their construction (ie do they draw air from a discrete location that I could attach a duct to?).

    Just having a make-up air duct in the room with the dryer is an obvious alternative, but I'd like to avoid drawing cold outdoor air through the room. Our climate is mild enough that having cold outdoor air ducted directly into the clothes dryer should only increase drying times slightly.

    Thanks,
    Dylan

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Eagle, Idaho
    Posts
    381
    I am not sure why you would put a supply duct into a cloths dryer.
    A dryer has either electric heating elements or a gas burner that heats up
    And will direct that hot air straight into the tumbling compartment.
    What is the useof hooking a supply duct up to a dryer?

    Can you draw up a little pictorial of your overall intention?
    Tell Obama he can keep the change

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    7
    The house envelope is airtight so we must supply either the house or dryer with make-up air. I'd like to duct directly to the dryer rather than run the cold air into the house. Same concept as with a wood stove with dedicated supply/combustion air.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    4,253
    Yes. I have had to do that with commercial laundries and in community laundries; apartments. Need to design duct with nearly zero pressure loss as the fans are not capable of static pressure. I just terminated in wall with a grille or in the floor below the dryer.
    If a nation expects to be ignorant and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what will never be. (Thomas Jefferson 1816)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    7
    Thanks Gibson,

    Can you tell me if it was difficult to connect the supply duct to the dryer itself? Was there a discrete point that you hooked the duct to or did you have to create some sort of flanged box sealed over a large area? Do some dryers make this easier than others? Also were you using commercial dryers or residential? I wonder if commercial units are made to facilitate this... residential units definitely aren't based on the calls I've made so far.

    Understood about the static pressure. We're going straight out the wall behind the unit so this shouldn't be a problem.

    Thanks for the help,
    Dylan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Skokie , IL near chicago
    Posts
    1,127

    just a thought

    Quote Originally Posted by dylamar View Post
    Thanks Gibson,

    Can you tell me if it was difficult to connect the supply duct to the dryer itself? Was there a discrete point that you hooked the duct to or did you have to create some sort of flanged box sealed over a large area? Do some dryers make this easier than others? Also were you using commercial dryers or residential? I wonder if commercial units are made to facilitate this... residential units definitely aren't based on the calls I've made so far.

    Understood about the static pressure. We're going straight out the wall behind the unit so this shouldn't be a problem.

    Thanks for the help,
    Dylan
    if you have an airtight house and you're pumping air out , will this create a negative pressure pressure in the house affecting a non power venting water heater & non sealed fireplace , etc....? Jack
    B[COLOR=a friend is one who knows us , but loves us anyway

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    7
    This is what we're avoiding by supplying make-up air.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Skokie , IL near chicago
    Posts
    1,127

    good move

    Quote Originally Posted by dylamar View Post
    This is what we're avoiding by supplying make-up air.
    to avoid all the problems of negative pressure in a home with fuel burning eqp't.......Jack
    B[COLOR=a friend is one who knows us , but loves us anyway

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Seattle WA
    Posts
    1,225
    Why not install an HRV and be done with it? Then you can actually have some fresh air in the house as well
    America; first we fight for our freedom,
    then we make laws to take it away.

    -Alfred E Newman

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    4,931
    Quote Originally Posted by LibertyTree View Post
    Why not install an HRV and be done with it? Then you can actually have some fresh air in the house as well
    If it's an airtight home, it HAS to have some type of makeup air somewhere.
    It can be in an HRV, or something.
    It still MUST have some type of fresh air. It's like breathing in a paper bag.


    Here's an idea.

    Put the dryer in a room, that has it's own makeup air. Just dump the air in the room.
    Spray the crap out of all the walls, the ceiling above it, plastic wrap, whatever. Just set it up as it's own little envelope.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    7
    The house has an HRV which supplies balanced ventilation to the house. We don't want to take it out of balance by having the dryer exhaust to outdoors without makeup air. So we need to supply make-up air and for the reasons I mentioned before we'd like to duct that make-up air straight to the dryer.

    Does anyone have experience doing this?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,058
    Quote Originally Posted by dylamar View Post
    The house has an HRV which supplies balanced ventilation to the house. We don't want to take it out of balance by having the dryer exhaust to outdoors without makeup air. So we need to supply make-up air and for the reasons I mentioned before we'd like to duct that make-up air straight to the dryer.

    Does anyone have experience doing this?
    Is the unit on the outside wall?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    7
    Yes. The supply duct run will be short and direct.

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