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Thread: oil furnace

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    132
    I went on an oil burner furnace call the other day and found that the oil nozzle kept leaking fuel into the fire box for quite a while after the burner shut off. Also, I believe there is a small amount of water in the oil as it is a pink color instead of the bright red I am used to seeing. Is the pump letting the oil by and letting it drip out the nozzle?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    201
    That's most likely right-the piston isn't seating properly when the regulator closes on shut-down (inside the fuel pump). If you have water in the fuel it most likely caused this problem. Water kills fuel pumps more than any other factor. Have someone fix the tank problem if it is leaking. Water, being heavier than fuel, will usually leak into the tank and settle on the bottom. When a tank fails it shows up as water in the fuel more often than premature run-outs.

    Don't try to fix any of this if you are not a qualified oilheat service tech!!!
    The situation you are describing could lead to a house fire and/or serious personal injury including death.

    [Edited by bodhisatva on 12-31-2005 at 10:27 AM]
    ...SHEEESH!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,666
    Pink oil is dyed kerosene. Red oil is #2 fuel or blended.
    Water in oil is not pink.
    If you pull the strainer or look at the nozzle or inside the nozzle assembly and it looks like grey foam then you have water in the tank. The pump will churn up the mixture to a foamy mess. And you will be busy changing out the fuel pump, nozzle and cleaning up the mess for quite a while. Not to mention getting the water out of the tank.

    The oil spray after shut down could be a bad nozzle or poor draft or air in the oil line.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    157
    Without being sure of good fuel, it'll be hard to troubleshoot. To get good fuel the tank has to be tilted so the shut off valve is on the high side. After the tank is moved or filled, the oil should be allowed to settle for a couple of hours. The low end of the tank will act as a sediment bowl, and the high end will supply clean fuel. After all that, I would start with a new nozzle and filter. Before start up I would bleed the line inside until I could see clean oil. As for the colour of the fuel, the sopplier will have the answers.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    201

    water looks like milk

    If the fuel looks milky it has water in it. Water and oil mix to form an emulsion that will look white or pinkish kind of like, no exactly like milk. If the fuel is pink and translucent it may just be the dye but if it's opaque (like milk) then you have water.
    ...SHEEESH!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    201


    The oil spray after shut down could be a bad nozzle or poor draft or air in the oil line. [/B][/QUOTE]

    Momentary oil spray after shutdown may be caused by these things but oil leaking "for quite a while" after shutdown indicates a fuel pump problem.
    ...SHEEESH!!!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    347
    you can get water indicater paste at your distributer. you put it on your oil dip stick and it will change to a red when it comes in contact with water. telling you how many gall. of water ( had a 1000 gall. tank with 150 gall. of water in it this week). check your pump presure and cut off should hold at 80% of running presure for 5 min.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    1,360
    When in doubt. Change the pump.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    2,666
    Originally posted by rasmussen6880
    check your pump presure and cut off should hold at 80% of running presure for 5 min.
    You're right, this should be done at every service call.
    I have a gauge with a 3/16 flare adapter. I attach it to the 3/16 jet line and check pump pressure and lock up pressure. This fits all modern American burners.
    Its rare to have a pump fail in this way compared to air in the line causing oil to spray into the burner at shutdown which happens a lot more.
    Very common for this scenario of air bubbles expanding and presurizing in the nozzle assembly, then squirting. Especially with a hot chamber and poor draft in Miller CMF mobile home furnaces.
    In fact Beckett has a bulletin on it printed at least 10 years ago. I'll dig it out if I have to.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    201
    Ok "oil lp man" you're right about checking cut-off and pressure on every call and about fuel pump failure being rare but,... You're talking about "off-cycle drip" with the de-gassing of the fuel in the nozzle line due to heat reflection from a ceramic fiber chamber.
    That isn't what Harry54 is describing when he sees oil leaking into the firebox for quite a while after shutdown. I would have told him (and did before I went back and deleted it) to check cut-off first but then doesn't this site have rules about such things? He needs to get a qualified tech out there and stop trying to weasel diy help out of us by sounding like he is one. No offense meant to anyone.
    ...SHEEESH!!!

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