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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    9
    Originally posted by atphvac
    Since first reading this thread I did some more research. Typical supply duct velocity at the register is 300 to 600 feet per minute. We design systems with ceiling heat registers for about 600 fpm (we use zoning systems for basements which increase velocity)and the register we typically use is a 10"x6" Hart and Cooley 831 which at that face velocity has a throw of 14 feet. Even when the face velocity drops to 400 fpm the throw is still 9 feet. I think simple design and register selection is why some guys think it works better in the ceiling while some feel it is better close to the floor. My register in the ceiling works better for us simply because of the design and register selection. With low supply air velocity you are probably making the right choice by going low with the duct.
    Along the line of what I was going to say. If you have the right terminal, with the right throw, the right induction, and all that, than the ceiling is not necessarily a bad place for it. Also, the supply registers have the most affect on comfort, given that they have the most influence on air movement. Therefore, return location generally isn't that critical. Even though it's moving air, the velocities are very low except for right at the grille.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Huntsville,AL
    Posts
    4,125
    insulating the outside wall is critical -- read at
    BUILDINGSCIENCE.com

    unless the wall was built correctly, with lots of drainage outside, one can cause long walls to buldge inward ( I have seen such )when the basement is heated & walls insulated all the way down --
    harvest rainwater,make SHADE,R75/50/30= roof/wall/floor, use HVAC mastic,caulk all wall seams!

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    717
    Originally posted by cem-bsee
    insulating the outside wall is critical -- read at
    BUILDINGSCIENCE.com

    unless the wall was built correctly, with lots of drainage outside, one can cause long walls to buldge inward ( I have seen such )when the basement is heated & walls insulated all the way down --
    -----------------------------------------
    if what you say is true (but,lol, very hard to believe)then the simple remedy would be to just build the wall properly and with adequate footing draiage.
    No big deal, just proper construction methods.

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