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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Jesup GA.
    Posts
    83

    50 pascal or 25 pascal?

    Quote Originally Posted by energy_rater_La View Post
    cool air,
    my point was that here in Louisiana
    our program tests both house and ducts @50Pa.
    with ductblaster.
    this is one of the rules for our program.

    if subtraction method was
    allowed, it would be..for us..still 50pa.

    I haven't had time to read the post pstu..
    maybe over the weekend.
    Thanks I understand.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West Monroe, LA
    Posts
    287
    I have always used Remrate to size homes out over the years. I have tried all load programs and all are pretty much the same. With that said Manual J and wright soft are up there with Remrate to me. Wright soft software in my opion over sizes by 1/2 ton unless everything is perfect. Manual J is spot on when it is done right but very time comsuming. Remrate to me is easy to use but I was taught on it through the same Energy Program that LA Energy Rater has and is working with.


    As far a duct leakage goes I do belive that uses good Margins but need to watch your blower door results and factor into the load along with air filtration along with all the other important sizing things that our homes have.

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Jesup GA.
    Posts
    83

    25 vs 50

    Quote Originally Posted by energy_rater_La View Post
    cool air,
    my point was that here in Louisiana
    our program tests both house and ducts @50Pa.
    with ductblaster.
    this is one of the rules for our program.

    if subtraction method was
    allowed, it would be..for us..still 50pa.

    I haven't had time to read the post pstu..
    maybe over the weekend.
    thanks

  4. #30
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    506
    FWIW here in California we can have up to 15% duct leakage with a system change out. If new ducts were put in then that number drops to 6%.
    So duct work in the attic and loses of 50% total energy is not far fetched.
    as Lynn pointed out in the DOE doc.

    I'm sure in the next few years foil flex will be the only thing allowed in attic's

  5. #31
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,164
    so even in a change out you address duct leakage? thats pretty good.
    wish we had that kind of enforcement here.
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    4H: Hot, Humid Houston H.O.
    Posts
    3,304
    The original paper sure seemed to say 86 CFM was the average duct leakage for the Houston area homes. Houston homes built in the last decade are not small, and it could be reasonably estimated the average AC size is about 5 tons -- that would be 3-5% duct leakage would it not? I find it hard to believe Houston area homes are constructed with this degree of craftsmanship.

    If this is not the straight up honest truth, then I would be interested to understand what data would allow a professional organization to say this. Scuttlebutt about the Centerpoint Energy marketing department is they are hardly committed to the truth, but the partner Advanced Energy looks like it has a reputation to uphold.

    -- Pstu

  7. #33
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    506
    Makes those mini splits better and better all the time

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    3,824
    From what a read California has a third party inspection on almost all HVAC work (title 24 and whatever else) that is being done in a home. I like it.
    Always here

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    Quote Originally Posted by energy star View Post
    From what a read California has a third party inspection on almost all HVAC work (title 24 and whatever else) that is being done in a home. I like it.
    New construction gets inspected when there is a water and electrical hookup.
    In our area (AZ) most replacement equipment is not inspected because contractors do not get permits. I imagine that this is true in most jurisdictions. Code doesn't mean anything when it is not enforced.
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  10. #36
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    south louisiana
    Posts
    3,164
    Code doesn't mean anything when it is not enforced.
    which is often the case in my area. in the cities there is
    enforcement, but in the rural areas it is spotty at best.

    often the code inspectors pov don't agree.
    code is dependent upon their interpertation of what it says.
    all those shalls and musts don't always make it to the job site.

    pstu..I find it hard to believe that 6% duct leakage is average anywhere.
    but I'm a skeptic until I see it/ test it for myself.
    I do know that it would have to be installers trained by same trainer
    or same installers doing the sealing work on all projects.

    and
    "If this is not the straight up honest truth, then I would be interested to understand what data would allow a professional organization to say this. Scuttlebutt about the Centerpoint Energy marketing department is they are hardly committed to the truth, but the partner Advanced Energy looks like it has a reputation to uphold."

    scuttlebut I get is that everyone a hedge factor. as utility programs begin to
    influence the auditing business people need to be realistic about just how
    much utility cost they want the average homeowner to save.
    50% lol..more like 15-20% this is what I get from my co-op and one of the
    two large utility provider's energy managers in my area.
    The cure of the part should not be attempted without the cure of the whole. ~Plato

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    Quote Originally Posted by energy_rater_La View Post
    ....people need to be realistic about just how much utility cost they want the average homeowner to save.
    50% lol..more like 15-20% this is what I get from my co-op and one of the
    two large utility provider's energy managers in my area.
    It really depends on the peak load capacity of the utility. Cutting AC load reduces peak load and makes the utilities more profitable. Why? Because peak loading consumes the most expensive electricity as most of the time the equipment needed is on standby. Also, if peak demand grows, new power plants must be planned and constructed.
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  12. #38
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    506
    Quote Originally Posted by energy star View Post
    From what a read California has a third party inspection on almost all HVAC work (title 24 and whatever else) that is being done in a home. I like it.
    Correct, the name Title 24 Building Energy Efficiency Standards is called title24 for short. It covers all type of home energy use from HVAC to windows to water heaters. Its updated every few years.

    If you take out a permit it will be inspected by the building dept ( code compliant) and then you are subject to a HERS testing. Can't remember what HERS stands for, but just think Energy Rater. They will check the subcool level by connecting up there gauges to the condenser and check the liquid line temp. They check the fan watt draw and CFM flow. They run a duct blaster and check for leaks.

    Like anything there are lot of rules and exceptions which is nice and a pain at the same time.


  13. #39
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    506
    Quote Originally Posted by lynn comstock View Post
    It really depends on the peak load capacity of the utility. Cutting AC load reduces peak load and makes the utilities more profitable. Why? Because peak loading consumes the most expensive electricity as most of the time the equipment needed is on standby. Also, if peak demand grows, new power plants must be planned and constructed.

    So the power company's answer is Smart meters that charge you twice as much during peak time. Which is 10am to 8pm and they charge you double when you go over the base line of 700 kWh too.

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