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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    37
    I am about to graduate my very good hvac school and i got a few interviews coming up, can anyone please give me a few tips or pointers about how to present myself, or what kind of questions they will ask?

    thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Office and warehouse in both Crystal River & New Port Richey ,FL
    Posts
    18,836
    Resume should include areas of study and you should be able to discuss these with ease during the interview.


    Briefly describing an area of study and asking how that fits in with the work you will be doing would be nice.IMHO

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,037
    Take your time and ramble through

    Here <<<---Click on that

    It is a search on 'interview' in this section. You will find tons of info quick and it will not have to be retyped by the pros and owners here.

    From what to wear to resume'


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    SE Michigan
    Posts
    17,998
    You will probably be givin an apptitude test. Know how to draw a basic circuit, how to tell which terminals on a compressor are common run and start, know what super heat and sub cooling are and so on. Be honest and humble as well as confident. Dont wear baggyass jeans, ear rings, piercings, nose rings, bone through your nose or a plate in your lip and just answer their questions. Best of luck!!
    Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people.

    Theodore Roosevelt

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    12,037

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    37
    Thanks everyone for the tips, I just had an interview w/ a controls company, it was 3 and a half hrs. long? does that mean something?, do you think this is a good career path to take?

    -thanks again, greatly appreciated

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    132
    It means that they where willing to spend a lot of time with you. That to me implies they are interested. Controls are a big part of the industry. More and more buildings are upgrading and or installing them. Good path to follow IMHO.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    28
    I graduated 8 months ago and I find that in interviews they ask me questions I later wish I had answered diff. Like what do u want to be.

    If you say helper or entry level and not much more they may start u with filters and insulation and nothing really worthy of paying for school. It was a union company and the company owner was expecting me to talk.

    He started telling me about how he has a bunch of steam fitters in his payroll and how most guys stay there 10 years.

    I think its maybe a interview killer to ask for to much. But I would have like to discuss if I was going to work with a tech and service jobs. How long of a probation period would I be before health insurance and union backing.

    I wanted to ask this later but was fired for being late a few times to many.( I was late from working late and starting at 6am a few times)

    I would have liked to have this discusion in the interview but these points didnt occur to me until maybe my 3rd week. I only worked a day with service tech and I believe that was from scheculing mistake.

    Beware of brief rushed quick hire interviews with not much talk u might be agreeing to work as helper for ever and only do filters and no service.
    If the pay is alot lower then u really know u need like 8hr u might be sorry.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,966

    Talking

    3.5 hours did they serve you coffee....that sounds GOOD! get yourself a notebook and write up each interview afterwards and note things like....company,name persons met,was it an add,contact,cold call,time,money mentioned,jobs/trucks,tech questions to you how much did i ask them(nothing wrong with that)......how many techs do you have,how many years are they with you,what kind of contracts do you have.when they ask "where do you see yourself in 10 years in this industry" being out in a my own truck doing all the aspects of service for the right company!take an owner or service mgr sitdown seriously both is cool too,but add a dispatcher or office mgr and you can just sit back and listen to them(4)interrupting each other....trying to outdo each other with questions to you.realize with each interview that it is great experience your getting in how to handle yourself and react to questions and ask them also.old "benchmark" i used over the years is there is nothing you can say that will GET you a job,but there is plenty thru a sitdown that will NOT get you that job.if they actually ask you about money and what your looking for,that is a sign they see more in you then you realize,and that is your call but otherwise never mention salary just let the interview roll.if they call you back for a 2nd sitdown then that is a hire and you can throw out "what rate would i be starting at"....good luck

    [Edited by maxster on 12-21-2005 at 05:43 PM]
    "when in doubt...jump it out" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1qEZHhJubY

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    37
    I actually went to the interview w/ a notebook but didnt take any notes, but after I left I jotted down a few things, he also gave me a schematic on a recent job they did at Bose. He also said he would call me next week, Does anyone think he will, He is looking for someone who is constantly willing to learn. I asked him many questions and he was enjoying explaining what his company is all about. Am I making a bad mistake by going into the control field right after graduating my hvac school, considering I have no experience and It would have pretty much made my schooling obsolite??? can anyone give me advice....pleese?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    1,018
    In an interview, the less you talk the better. Studies have shown that the less you say, the better the impression the interviewer has of you. It’s human nature, people love to hear themselves talk. At the end of the interview you should have some prepared questions for the interviewer. Like previous posts stated, you need to know what you’re getting into.

    As for whether you should take the job or not, well, some details of your duties would help. Is it a controls only company or do they do the complete system? If they do the complete system, there may be opportunities to learn the other aspects of the trade. I would guess you would start as a helper pulling control wires. When there is no control work to be done, you could be learning the other parts of the trade. This would make you a more rounded tech and thus more valuable to your employer.

    Good Luck
    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten". --Benjamin Franklin
    "Don't argue with an idiot, they will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience". --Mark Twain
    http://www.campbellmechanical.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    529
    I find it very important to listen extremely carefully to the interviewer's questions and what he/she says during the interview. Try to determine the underlying reason for the questions so you can answer them in a way that fully meets the interviewer's needs. Give physical feedback to the interviewer as they speak, nod, laugh, agree with them, etc to show genuine interest in them and the company. Follow-up immediately after the interview with a thank you card thanking them for their time spent with you and for the opportunity to be introduced to the company. Tell them that given the opportunity you would like to be an integral part of the company's successful future. Above all be neat, courteous and speak well.
    The posts and comments made by me are in no way affiliated with any company or organization. They are simply my personal opinions.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Posts
    6,966

    Thumbs up

    getting in is the important thing,even in the contol field it will bring you soooner or later to the equipment,and that is still experience to sell later on.you might be doing both anyway if it is the right company that does complete start-up and sign-offs
    "when in doubt...jump it out" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U1qEZHhJubY

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