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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,335
    OP:

    your best course of action is to talk with the service manager and find out what options he will offer you, once you explain this dilemma. Sometimes, when a field tech is not able to find his way, the service manager can visit and set him straight.

    If this is not an option, you may be better served by getting a recommendation for a company from a trusted friend and have THEM come out and have a look. Tell them what you know, and ask what it will take to find out the cause of the problem.

    Then, proceed form there.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

    RSES CMS, HVAC Electrical Specialist

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  2. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    North West FL
    Posts
    97
    "I’d like to thank all you for your input. Unfortunately none of them make me feel very good. The gist seems to be that I wasted a lot of money for a quick fix just so I could stay cool. I wasn’t expecting things to be perfect, but had I known that this fix was going to result in such high head pressures I might have declined. The tech that suggested this combination didn’t tell me that the results would be this bad.

    As a customer I don’t see how this could be my fault and I think I should receive some consideration. I’m just not sure what I can reasonable ask for. "



    It's not your fault that the install tech did not know what he was doing. However, it is in your hands to find a company that can give you what you want. How many bids did you get? How many phone calls did you make? How many reviews did you check? All that could have been done in one tenth of the time it has taken you to try to find a solution to the prob. It sucks that you have to work at finding a good company, but it has to be done. As hard as it is to find someone good, it's harder to find someone that will come back and fix the problem. Esp after you have paid them. Do a good deed and call out someone who knows what they are doing. They will be able to give the answers you need.
    www.mcleanair.com

    "It was working until it quit."

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,060
    Do you have any other data on the installation? Compressor amps? Do we even know that the technicians guages where correctly calibrated?

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,563
    Quote Originally Posted by McLean Air View Post
    It's not your fault that the install tech did not know what he was doing. However, it is in your hands to find a company that can give you what you want. How many bids did you get? How many phone calls did you make? How many reviews did you check? All that could have been done in one tenth of the time it has taken you to try to find a solution to the prob. It sucks that you have to work at finding a good company, but it has to be done. As hard as it is to find someone good, it's harder to find someone that will come back and fix the problem. Esp after you have paid them. Do a good deed and call out someone who knows what they are doing. They will be able to give the answers you need.
    McLean Air,

    Please read and follow AOP forum rules.

    A link to those rules can be found below this post in my signature line

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Winston-Salem NC
    Posts
    1,133
    Quote Originally Posted by dandyme View Post
    I'm a little concerned with:
    "The more skilled technician found that the system was overcharged and reduced the charge as much as he could."
    Could of been a case where bringing the high side down left the low side too low, and bringing the suction up, raised the head too much.

    Easy to see that happening with stuff not matched. I'd probably say getting a matched ID Coil, metering device and new line set would solve the problem. How folks figure not matching ID/OD is a good thing, I'll never understand.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    6,039
    Another quick note - Just because the outdoor unit was capable of up to 12 seer does not mean they the installed the higher end air handler. Or the correct piston 16 years ago.

    I mostly find higher end condensors on base line handler designed for the 10seer models.

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,510
    Quote Originally Posted by SBKold View Post
    Another quick note - Just because the outdoor unit was capable of up to 12 seer does not mean they the installed the higher end air handler. Or the correct piston 16 years ago.

    I mostly find higher end condensors on base line handler designed for the 10seer models.
    In cooling mode a smaller evaporator coil does not cause high head pressure.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    6,039
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacrmedic View Post
    In cooling mode a smaller evaporator coil does not cause high head pressure.
    was not my intention to say that

    Usually the handler had the 10seer generic piston ...which would cause installer to overcharge slightly to compensate to get cold back....which can lead to higher head...correct me if im wrong.

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,510
    Quote Originally Posted by SBKold View Post
    was not my intention to say that

    Usually the handler had the 10seer generic piston ...which would cause installer to overcharge slightly to compensate to get cold back....which can lead to higher head...correct me if im wrong.
    That would be incorrect. If you had higher head you'd have a higher PD across the MD, and then you'd be overfeeding the evap and flooding back, would you not?

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    6,039
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacrmedic View Post
    That would be incorrect. If you had higher head you'd have a higher PD across the MD, and then you'd be overfeeding the evap and flooding back, would you not?
    Of course which is why the additional refrig was added to decrease SH.

    "high" head is generic. I just meant higher than normal.

    I simply posted the origional to mention that just because the condensor was a high seer of its day doesnt mean the handler was.

    The origional 10seer piston would be considerably smaller and will cause you to add more refrig than nameplate states to get desired suction temp and pressure.

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,510
    Quote Originally Posted by SBKold View Post
    Of course which is why the additional refrig was added to decrease SH.

    "high" head is generic. I just meant higher than normal.

    I simply posted the origional to mention that just because the condensor was a high seer of its day doesnt mean the handler was.

    The origional 10seer piston would be considerably smaller and will cause you to add more refrig than nameplate states to get desired suction temp and pressure.
    Yes, in that case it would run a higher head than what is normal for a 13 SEER condenser. But it would still run lower than what is normal for a 10 SEER. So whether you consider the head pressure high or low, well that depends upon what you're comparing the head pressure to. The OP reported a condenser TD of 32. Under the conditions he gave that's a high TD even for a 10 SEER. If the coil was originally set up as an 8 SEER match, then I could see the head pressure being the result solely of the present mismatch.

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