Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 15
  1. #1

    coated evaporator repair

    Does anyone have a good prodoct to seal a small leak on a coated evaporator? I have a pinhole on an evaporator in a beverage air prep refer,would rather not have to remove vinyl protective coating if possible. Would an epoxy sealant over the coating be acceptable? The leak is on the u-bend of the evaporator.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,723

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Poughkeepsie, Ny
    Posts
    632
    They used to have a product called 'techinacan' but they stopped making it years ago. Now you have to call a guy who has training and the tools in to fix it.
    Happiness is the only good. The time to be happy is now. The place to be happy is here. The way to be happy is to make others so.
    -Robert Green Ingersoll

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PLATTSBURGH, NY 12901
    Posts
    42
    The only way is to get down to the source of the leak which is through the copper or aluminum. With no pressure and time to sit there is a no solder leak repair liquid paste that would work. It states that it can hold up to 2500 psi. Almost all supply houses carry it now. Good Luck!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Bristol NH
    Posts
    229
    I have pretty good luck with small hard to repair leaks using a product from superseal. A stop leak charged into the system while it is running. Has a leak dye and acid nuetralizer in it too. It's about $$$$ a can but it has saved my company a bundle.
    Last edited by Chris_Worthington; 09-15-2011 at 07:08 AM. Reason: Pricing Removed

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,723
    Quote Originally Posted by boilerman856 View Post
    I have pretty good luck with small hard to repair leaks using a product from superseal. A stop leak charged into the system while it is running. Has a leak dye and acid nuetralizer in it too. It's about Too expensive a can but it has saved my company a bundle.
    So, instead of having the skill and patience required to find and properly repair a leak, you dump a can of glue, dye and some other goo into the system, contaminating it?

    Sounds like a great plan.

    Do you also charge your customers for installing compressor killer?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Bristol NH
    Posts
    229
    Well jpsmith I see you know everything about my situation. Actually I am responsiblefor almost 100 rtu for my company And many of them in your perfect world should ne replaced due because of age,condition and major components not being available anymore. But in the real world where i live my job is to keep this aging fleet going as long and inexpensively as possible. If i can get another year or two out of it by squirting in some "glue" i am going to do it. That being said do you have anything constructive to say that might help the guy with a coated coil problem?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,723
    Quote Originally Posted by boilerman856 View Post
    Well jpsmith I see you know everything about my situation. Actually I am responsiblefor almost 100 rtu for my company And many of them in your perfect world should ne replaced due because of age,condition and major components not being available anymore. But in the real world where i live my job is to keep this aging fleet going as long and inexpensively as possible. If i can get another year or two out of it by squirting in some "glue" i am going to do it. That being said do you have anything constructive to say that might help the guy with a coated coil problem?
    I already said my constructive piece.

    As for knowing your situation, I don't HAVE to know your situation, I know refrigeration and I know that stuff is not a good thing to be adding to your systems.

    And as far as being responsible for 100 RTUs......

    Well, I'll see your hundred RTUs and raise you a couple hundred RTUs, a hundred rack systems or so and some other miscellaneous systems, too.

    Find the leak, repair it correctly and move on.

    Leave the glue for the hacks.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Arnold, Mo
    Posts
    437
    I fold!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    32
    not sure if this is a diy job or a service call? but the only way to repair a leak is to get your torch out of your truck/van. it will elliminate alot of thoughts in your noodle, about will this stuff work?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PLATTSBURGH, NY 12901
    Posts
    42

    The only way is get your torch out.....

    In a world with ever changing technologies there is never just one way to repair something. The key to properly repairing something is knowing that in the end what you are fixing has your name on it. Can you live with that or do you even care? That's the real question. I personally have never used the paste I mentioned in my last post but I believe as long as it stays on the outside of the system and doesn't introduce any contaminants into the system in the end it is just an epoxy for refrigeration performing the same task as silv.solder and a torch except it can hold up to 2500psi.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    So.Cal
    Posts
    447
    An epoxy that says it can hold 2500psi. Where do they get these crazy numbers. Most copper pipe will burst at 1000psi; maybe we should use epoxy pipe.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    PLATTSBURGH, NY 12901
    Posts
    42
    I am not sure that is the point of my last post but OK?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event