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  1. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Mid-Mo
    Posts
    3,595
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    Not a HVAC pro, but as you see I've been on here 10yrs. Actually I repair TV's and Appliances for a living, HVAC is a interest/hobby of mine. I looked into doing HVAC for a living but I can't work minimum wage while I "pay my dues" as a installer/ductwork guy. I understand most trades require "paying their dues (mine included), but the time to be moved from installer to a well paid tech is too long. As a TV/Appliance tech the electrical stuff comes relatively easy to me, it's the refrigerant stuff I'd have to get field experience with. I could even repair the control boards if it's economically feasible, although if it's like TV/Appliances these days it's more cost effective just to replace the board.
    Just going to make a stab at it that you work for Sears/A&E Factory service?

  2. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    SW Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,989
    Quote Originally Posted by fearlessfurnace View Post
    If the coils are dirty the system can't run right clean them first.
    Bad (dirty) coils will drop the superheat on a fixed orifice so the balanced charge will be less refigerant.
    That is why the indoor coil ought to have enough space under it to get a good view of the coil & fins. That makes it possible to spray the coil from both sides, use a soft brush, & catch the run-off in a pan.

    It is good practice to use evaporator coil cleaner at intervals that will insure optimal heat transfer - efficient performance.

    Blower wheel blades must also be kept clean, & mark where the balance weights are in case they're knocked off.
    Last edited by udarrell; 09-09-2011 at 10:54 PM. Reason: Blower wheel blades...

  3. #42
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,292
    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post
    Commercial controls would be your best bet as a point of entry, if that was your choice.

    As an aside, I would say tv repair would be a tough trade to do well in. While I realize it's far more centralized than days of old, you are always battling against the cost of replacement. Seems like medical equipment would be the better gig.
    As somebody who has repaired TV's for 20yrs we had to start picking up appliance work a few years ago due to the low cost of TV's nowadays. Warranty rates are dropping for both TV and appliance work, that's why I'm looking into doing something else. It's getting as bad as what the home warranty companies are doing to HVAC contractors.

  4. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    4,292
    Quote Originally Posted by ryan1088 View Post
    Just going to make a stab at it that you work for Sears/A&E Factory service?
    Nope, I work for an independent shop. The techs at A&E/Sears do basically the same thing we do.

  5. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Posts
    26
    A question related to charging correctly ...

    When a tech came to repair a leak in my indoor coil (TXV valve connection leak), he added refrigerant based on the pressure readings of his gauges connected to the low and high side ... is this an accurate way to charge?

    Thanks,
    Mike

  6. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Down by the river
    Posts
    1,664
    Quote Originally Posted by mroberts View Post
    A question related to charging correctly ...

    When a tech came to repair a leak in my indoor coil (TXV valve connection leak), he added refrigerant based on the pressure readings of his gauges connected to the low and high side ... is this an accurate way to charge?

    Thanks,
    Mike
    a very important part of one.
    It's hard to stop a Trane. but I have made one helluva living keeping them going.

  7. #46
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    352
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacrmedic View Post
    Rheem doesn't say that it's their preferred method. See the attached Installation manual below. Page 14.

    Goodman doesn't even cover weighing in the charge in the second of the two attached manuals.

    Just saying.
    Seems like we are saying the same thing, really. I read both manuals. Both say to add refrigerant by weight per foot of line set beyond 15 feet. Both also say to verify proper charge by superheat and or subcooling after start up. That is essentially what I said earlier.

    I never said that it was the "preferred" method. I said manufacturers recommend weighing in charge on installation. PAge 6 of the Goodman manual says to. Page 14 of the Rheem manual says to. They recommend it both times.

    Where is the discrepancy?
    It's not rocket-science...

    It's electromechanical thermodynamic engineering

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,665
    i know that most manufactures say weight in the charge . although is the evaporator coil that is installed is that the coil that the refrigerant charge was based on . if you put a larger coil to increase the seer you will need more refrigerant. mabey its just me but i have measured line sets and weighed in the charge and i never come up with the correct subcool or superheat almost always short on gas

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Mn the state where absolutey nothing is allowed
    Posts
    1,351
    dont forget this assumes th the factory actually weigh the correct charge in the condensing unit b4 it was shipped!

    after installation verifing proper SH & SC many times reveils low charge and recently i've found drastic over charges.

    weigh in is a starting point. the equipment isnt installed in a lab setting. charge must be set to operate with in the enviroment its installed.

    if your not testing, your guessing
    my boss thinks its possible to repeal the laws of physics

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southeastern Pa
    Posts
    18,563
    I was working as a "tan" tech when the fed building was bombed in Oklahoma City. I fixed tv's and appliances, particularly those using refrigerant. I vividly recall getting a trailer load of RCAs with bad picture tubes. I had worked through them about halfway when RCA (Thompson) said we should stop the process and ship them to some warehouse in New Jersey.

    Its true. Its almost impossible to make a living in appliance repair. The units are so cheap that replacement costs less.
    [Avatar photo from a Florida training accident. Everyone walked away.]
    2 Tim 3:16-17

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  11. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Hampton, GA
    Posts
    570
    I have a question to add to this thread. When they say to : "If line set
    exceeds 15 feet in length, refrigerant should be added at .6
    ounces per foot of liquid line."
    If one accounts for the additional line set and properly charges the unit. Then when one measures the sub-cooling do you still base your charge off the manufactures chart? ( sub-cooling number vs outdoor temperature?) Is the manufactures sub-cooling chart independent of whatever the line set length maybe? I mean would it matter? Or is the sub-cooling chart calculated already with X amount of line set? (example the 15 ft manufactures are mentioning in the manual). I am kind of asking would one go with the chart or some other way after accounting for the additional line set?

  12. #51
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,320
    Quote Originally Posted by mofotech View Post
    I have a question to add to this thread. When they say to : "If line set
    exceeds 15 feet in length, refrigerant should be added at .6
    ounces per foot of liquid line."
    If one accounts for the additional line set and properly charges the unit. Then when one measures the sub-cooling do you still base your charge off the manufactures chart? ( sub-cooling number vs outdoor temperature?) Is the manufactures sub-cooling chart independent of whatever the line set length maybe? I mean would it matter? Or is the sub-cooling chart calculated already with X amount of line set? (example the 15 ft manufactures are mentioning in the manual). I am kind of asking would one go with the chart or some other way after accounting for the additional line set?
    I can't go too far on your question other than to say that measured performance is king, period.

    To say more would flirt with breaking the rules.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  13. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Lancaster PA
    Posts
    68,095
    Quote Originally Posted by mofotech View Post
    I have a question to add to this thread. When they say to : "If line set
    exceeds 15 feet in length, refrigerant should be added at .6
    ounces per foot of liquid line."
    If one accounts for the additional line set and properly charges the unit. Then when one measures the sub-cooling do you still base your charge off the manufactures chart? ( sub-cooling number vs outdoor temperature?) Is the manufactures sub-cooling chart independent of whatever the line set length maybe? I mean would it matter? Or is the sub-cooling chart calculated already with X amount of line set? (example the 15 ft manufactures are mentioning in the manual). I am kind of asking would one go with the chart or some other way after accounting for the additional line set?
    This and other questions are answered in the pro tech forums.
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