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  1. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    SW Michigan, near Battle Creek
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    921
    Quote Originally Posted by udarrell View Post
    A heavy indoor humidity load tosses the beer-can-cold non-sense out the window.

    The outdoor dew point determines at what temp the suction line sweats; that's fools gold methodology...
    british ale is drunk at 60F more ore less. Thats 40F evaporating temp plus 20F superheat.

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,213
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    On systems that have been in service for a few years how does dirty condensers/evaporator coils factor in?
    You forgot dirty blower wheels and bad duct design along with poor to no effort to dial in airflow, but the answer is plenty.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

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  3. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    SW Michigan, near Battle Creek
    Posts
    921
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    On systems that have been in service for a few years how does dirty condensers/evaporator coils factor in?
    If the coils are dirty the system can't run right clean them first. b
    Bad coils will drop the superheat on a fixed orifice so the balanced charge will be less refigerant.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    3,960
    Of course cleaning the coils (especially the condenser) should be done before charging, but how many techs actually do this? And then there is the blower wheel/low airflow issues, are these also addressed before determining correct charge?

    On my system the indoor humidity goes up when the condenser coil gets dirty. It doesn't LOOK dirty, but cleaning it drops the humidity. Maybe the indoor coil is getting colder due to the clean condenser?

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    In a boiler room
    Posts
    6,915
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    Of course cleaning the coils (especially the condenser) should be done before charging, but how many techs actually do this? All the good ones.

    And then there is the blower wheel/low airflow issues, are these also addressed before determining correct charge? If the homeowner agrees to pay for it.
    My comments in red.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,213
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    Of course cleaning the coils (especially the condenser) should be done before charging, but how many techs actually do this? And then there is the blower wheel/low airflow issues, are these also addressed before determining correct charge?
    As to cleaning the condenser, yes it comes part and parcel with my work and is covered under my annual maintenance charge that is typically added as part of the repair unless I know that it's clean.

    With 1000+ posts, I should ask, are you a pro or what?
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Moore, Oklahoma, United States
    Posts
    3,960
    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post
    As too cleaning the condenser, yes it comes part and parcel with my work and is covered under my annual maintenance charge that is typically added as part of the repair unless I know that it's clean.

    With 1000+ posts, I should ask, are you a pro or what?
    Not a HVAC pro, but as you see I've been on here 10yrs. Actually I repair TV's and Appliances for a living, HVAC is a interest/hobby of mine. I looked into doing HVAC for a living but I can't work minimum wage while I "pay my dues" as a installer/ductwork guy. I understand most trades require "paying their dues (mine included), but the time to be moved from installer to a well paid tech is too long. As a TV/Appliance tech the electrical stuff comes relatively easy to me, it's the refrigerant stuff I'd have to get field experience with. I could even repair the control boards if it's economically feasible, although if it's like TV/Appliances these days it's more cost effective just to replace the board.

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
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    2,213
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    Not a HVAC pro, but as you see I've been on here 10yrs. Actually I repair TV's and Appliances for a living, HVAC is a interest/hobby of mine. I looked into doing HVAC for a living but I can't work minimum wage while I "pay my dues" as a installer/ductwork guy. I understand most trades require "paying their dues (mine included), but the time to be moved from installer to a well paid tech is too long. As a TV/Appliance tech the electrical stuff comes relatively easy to me, it's the refrigerant stuff I'd have to get field experience with. I could even repair the control boards if it's economically feasible, although if it's like TV/Appliances these days it's more cost effective just to replace the board.
    Commercial controls would be your best bet as a point of entry, if that was your choice.

    As an aside, I would say tv repair would be a tough trade to do well in. While I realize it's far more centralized than days of old, you are always battling against the cost of replacement. Seems like medical equipment would be the better gig.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  9. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,158
    Quote Originally Posted by HVACTechNC View Post
    So am I mistaken that most major manufacturers recommend weighing in additional refrigerant on unit start-up. I am almost 100% certain that both Rheem and York on their installation manuals have a supplemental charge section that gives weight by line set size and length.

    I am all for checking the superheat and subcooling on system test to verify proper operation, in fact you would be doing the customer/system a disservice to just weigh in a charge and not verify it. all I'm saying is that the manufacturer recommends weigh-in as their preferred method.
    Rheem doesn't say that it's their preferred method. See the attached Installation manual below. Page 14.

    Goodman doesn't even cover weighing in the charge in the second of the two attached manuals.

    Just saying.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
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    2,213
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacrmedic View Post
    Rheem doesn't say that it's their preferred method. See the attached Installation manual below. Page 14.

    Goodman doesn't even cover weighing in the charge in the second of the two attached manuals.

    Just saying.
    actually, page 6 of the goodman manual:

    Adequate refrigerant charge for a matching evaporator and 15
    feet line set is supplied with the condensing unit. If line set
    exceeds 15 feet in length, refrigerant should be added at .6
    ounces per foot of liquid line.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


  11. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    SW Michigan, near Battle Creek
    Posts
    921
    Quote Originally Posted by 54regcab View Post
    Of course cleaning the coils (especially the condenser) should be done before charging, but how many techs actually do this? And then there is the blower wheel/low airflow issues, are these also addressed before determining correct charge?

    On my system the indoor humidity goes up when the condenser coil gets dirty. It doesn't LOOK dirty, but cleaning it drops the humidity. Maybe the indoor coil is getting colder due to the clean condenser?
    yep

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    5,158
    Quote Originally Posted by darctangent View Post
    actually, page 6 of the goodman manual:

    Adequate refrigerant charge for a matching evaporator and 15
    feet line set is supplied with the condensing unit. If line set
    exceeds 15 feet in length, refrigerant should be added at .6
    ounces per foot of liquid line.
    That is not the weigh in method per se. It only covers the additional lineset charge, and is not intended to be "the" charging method. That passage is followed immediately by,

    "FINAL CHARGE ADJUSTMENT
    The outdoor temperature must be 60F or higher. Set the room
    thermostat to COOL, fan switch to AUTO, and set the temperature
    control well below room temperature.
    After system has stabilized per startup instructions, check
    subcooling and superheat
    as detailed in the following section."

  13. #39
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Denver/Boulder
    Posts
    2,213
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacrmedic View Post
    That is not the weigh in method per se. It only covers the additional lineset charge, and is not intended to be "the" charging method. That passage is followed immediately by,

    "FINAL CHARGE ADJUSTMENT
    The outdoor temperature must be 60F or higher. Set the room
    thermostat to COOL, fan switch to AUTO, and set the temperature
    control well below room temperature.
    After system has stabilized per startup instructions, check
    subcooling and superheat
    as detailed in the following section."
    Completely agreed.

    It is covered under "initial charge" which to me is the same thing as guesstimate. I actually find that typically overcharges the system.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are small matters compared to what lies within us.


    Two pressures, four temperatures = SUCCESS!


    Boulder Heating Contractor


    For Consumers:

    For HVACR Professionals:


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