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Thread: Bohn coil leak

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    295

    Question Bohn coil leak

    Got a 13KBTU bohn refrigeration coil with a leak on a copper loop near the TXV. Coil looks to be in reasonably good condition. I am thinking about trying to repair it, but am a little nervous with how thin the copper coils are in these things today. In the old days, I wouldn't think twice about brazing a leak like this, but now?
    What do you guys do, repair or replace?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Miami
    Posts
    258
    Hey, it don't work the way it is now so what the heck???

    If you are really afraid I have had good luck with "red hot" epoxy on aluminum evaporators. Try 3TA69 at Grainger.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    25,950

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    where it's nice and warm
    Posts
    276
    JP is right, fix it using your torch and silver solder. Don't use any epoxy or crazy glue.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Madison, WI
    Posts
    295
    Yes, I had success fixing it. I used a small air-acetylene tip and #15 braze. I was just nervous because once I got a copper bend too hot with my oxy-acetylene and it melted the pipe. I was amazed how thin the piping was in that little bohn unit, seemed to melt like aluminum foil.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    840
    Jackal, I had the same reservations a W/I cooler two days ago. One condenser feeding two evaporators. BOTH evaporators developed a leak on the exact same U-tube forming the turn of their coils. Already familiar with exasperation of MELTING a big, ole hole in thin-walled tubing, I approached THIS one (actually - two) ever so delicately. A a crude gage of my torch intensity, I first tested the flame on my silver brazing rod. With that "low" flame, was able to complete the repairs without incident.
    Even after years of experience, I still gain a bit more confidence in my torch skills each time I use it.


    "You never know what others don't know." -

    If I can't laugh at myself...then I'll laugh at YOU! -

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    66
    Just be careful on the amount of heat you put on old copper. It becomes thin over time and will melt and collapse easily with too much heat.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Southern Oklahoma
    Posts
    55
    Sometimes its easier to use some copper to make a "scab" and braze a little distance around the hole. If the copper is thin at the hole it will almost always fall away. By using the "scab over" method I've been able to fix pin holes and cracks usually without callbacks.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    new jersey
    Posts
    256
    I've. Used the scab patch on a coil before. If its a blowout on a bend braze it. If its pin holes don't waste your time

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