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  1. #27
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    Sep 2008
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    Western PA
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  2. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    53
    Yes I do, but I'm driving so I am going to have to do this after bit

  3. #29
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    Sep 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by 02powerstroke View Post
    Yes I do, but I'm driving so I am going to have to do this after bit
    Drop the phone and hold onto the wheel!



    Catch you later if I can.

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    53
    greater subcooling means that you you are below the saturation temp by so many degrees... waht this means is that the refrigerant can absorb more energy before it starts to evaporate... If you have more refrigerant, more subcooling and the same load, you will have less refrigerant turning to a vapor (vaporization) so your vapor pressure will be lower on the suction side of teh compressor... all it means is that you are getting more cooling out of your refrigerant...

    Am I missing something without going into enthalpys?

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Down by the river
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    ? hmmmm?? design pressures on manufacture label?/? = test pressure, not operating design.


    now if we are talking design pressures for operating temps and pressures and they are that high, you have the wrong refrigerant.
    It's hard to stop a Trane. but I have made one helluva living keeping them going.

  6. #32
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    Sep 2008
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    Western PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by 02powerstroke View Post
    greater subcooling means that you you are below the saturation temp by so many degrees... waht this means is that the refrigerant can absorb more energy before it starts to evaporate... If you have more refrigerant, more subcooling and the same load, you will have less refrigerant turning to a vapor (vaporization) so your vapor pressure will be lower on the suction side of teh compressor... all it means is that you are getting more cooling out of your refrigerant...

    Am I missing something without going into enthalpys?
    You're overthinking.

    In simple terms, if you measure subcooling, what do you know?

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    53
    Your refrigerant is a liquid

  8. #34
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    309
    Quote Originally Posted by 02powerstroke View Post
    Your refrigerant is a liquid
    It gives you an idea of how much liquid is in the condenser coil. If you had a restriction in the evap area, you might accumulate more refrigerant on the condenser

  9. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    53
    Quote Originally Posted by ChaseAir View Post
    It gives you an idea of how much liquid is in the condenser coil. If you had a restriction in the evap area, you might accumulate more refrigerant on the condenser
    thank you... that makes sense

  10. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    53
    ok... I went back and tested it one more time.. here is what I ended up with

    Suction Line Temperature ~ 60F
    Suction Pressure - 83 PSI
    Liquid Line Temp - 96F
    Discharge Pressure 202psi
    Refrigerant - R22

    THe model of the condensing unit is a 38CKC042

  11. #37
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    309
    11 superheat. 6 subcool. It would help to know indoor wb db and delta t.

    You have low subcool for sure. If it is a txv metering device, it is most likely undercharged. If it is a piston, you either have low airflow or too big of a piston.

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    53
    Indoor temp is 78F, will have to measure wet bulb. The consensing unit is a piston unit. This is an original split on a ranch that had the basement finished recently.

  13. #39
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    Sep 2008
    Location
    Western PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by 02powerstroke View Post
    Your refrigerant is a liquid
    Exactly.


    And what part of the system needs liquid to operate correctly?

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