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Thread: colder upstairs

  1. #1

    Confused

    I have a three store townhouse and it is much colder on the top floor than on other floors, middle level gets really hot if top level gets barely warm. And for that I have to set thermostat on 77. Does anyone know what the problem may be. I appreciate any hints. thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
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    3,317
    Low bid builder install.
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    73
    What kind of heating system is it? where is the thermostat located?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    1,209
    When was this system installed and what type (gas etc)? You may have dampers that you don't know about. Otherwise, you may be in for a long road to comfort. Good luck.
    Proud supporter of Springfield Millers and Oregon Ducks.

  5. #5

    Hmm

    Thanks for replies. The system was installed two years ago, but I just bought the house. It's electrical heating system with thermostat on the middle floor. Are there any obvious things I should troubleshoot before calling professionals? I mean, everybody who owns townhouse say their top floor is hot and basement cold. What's up with my house?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
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    3,317
    Until you call a pro to evaluate the system, it is hard to judge through a monitor.

    Could be something like the supply and return connections were reversed when the equipment was replaced. Have you checked to see that the supply vents are blowing air?

    Hidden dampers have been mentioned. Maybe one is stuck closed somewhere. Any registers not working anywhere?

    You could have smashed or disconnected duct in an attic or wall. Again, any registers not working? Looked in the attic/basement for ducts that aren't connected?

    Lots of luck.

    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  7. #7
    Thank you, I do need to check those things. Other ideas welcome. Also is it within the norm to set thermostat on 77. I heard it should be on around 70. Thanks again.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rochester, MN
    Posts
    5,304
    on an avg, heating is set at 68, and cooling at 76.


  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Yo.... Here!, I'm right here..
    Posts
    6,236
    Originally posted by coldhouse
    I have a three store townhouse and it is much colder on the top floor than on other floors, middle level gets really hot if top level gets barely warm. And for that I have to set thermostat on 77. Does anyone know what the problem may be. I appreciate any hints. thanks.
    Ahhhhhhhhhh I'll guess

    Little to no Insulation and bad duct design.

    I'll bet I'm right,

    The bet is a dollar

    Heh I win


    You owe me a dollar

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    The thing that sucks about poor design is the builder made their money and the homeowner gets screwed.
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    5,044
    agreed neo. Especially when general contractors decide that your company has the best work, yet then nickle and dimes you. My understanding, is this happens alot down ghetto rebuilds.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Near Chicago, IL
    Posts
    3,317
    Originally posted by hvacvegas
    agreed neo. Especially when general contractors decide that your company has the best work, yet then nickle and dimes you. My understanding, is this happens alot down ghetto rebuilds.
    The location of the home does not matter in my area. It happens in tract homes and townhomes all the way up to true customs.

    Nationally known builders build em cheap, cheap, cheap and charge out the wazoo. It only has to last a year.

    True high end builders ($1M plus) may be willing to pay the price because the client demands it, but the HVAC contractor can get nickel and dimed to death on change orders.
    Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance

    "There is hardly anything in the world that some man cannot make a little worse and sell a little cheaper, and the people who consider price only are this man's lawful prey. It's unwise to pay too little.
    When you pay too much, you lose a little money -- that is all. When you pay too little, you may lose everything, because the thing you bought was incapable of doing the thing it was bought to do.

    The common law of business balance prohibits paying a little and getting a lot -- it can't be done. If you deal with the lowest bidder, it is well to add something for the risk you run. And if you do that, you will have enough to pay for something better."

    John Ruskin


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