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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Bristol NH
    Posts
    229

    Confused rooftop workload

    Got a question for everyone in commercial hvac. I have been a heating and a/c tech about 10 years now but in central NH it is mostly heat. Last year I started working again factory on the hvac equipment. We have 85 rooftops ranging from 7 to 40 tons, 3 chillers,35,180&200 tons. Does this seem like a lot of equipment for just one guy to take care of? I slip farther behind every day. Many of these units are 20-25 years old! Any insight on this would be a great help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Kent, WA.
    Posts
    192
    Are all the equipment at the same location? I take care of bunch of equipment, one building alone has several hundred hydronic heat pumps. I always find new projects usually take a long time at first. Finding all the stuff that's broke and hasn't been maintained in years and getting it up to par seems like it takes forever. Ive had times where i felt like i was not making any headway. Soon you will have everything running as it should and you will be ahead of the game. You will find yourself waiting for something to break as I do in some of the buildings i take care of.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Spokane WA
    Posts
    305
    I think Hotrodrob is real accurate.

    What I would say is make a list of the worst breakdown units and worst condition and start replacing them slowly or as quickly as really necessary. They have met their life expectancy already. I worked in a factory where we had hundreds of pieces of equipment in all shapes and sizes, it took about a year to stop putting out fires. The units had been neglected for a long while and the previous guy was being pulled too many different directions and he couldn't keep afloat. When I can on they hired a second guy for me so we could get a grip on things.

    Good luck and change out those clunkers!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Bristol NH
    Posts
    229
    Thanks guys looks like I am not in such bad shape. All my units are on the same roof and they WON'T buy new without an act of God. I have good and bad days but slowly moving forward, they have beenvery neglected an over used. On the bright side I am getting a great tan... thanks for the input!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    houston, texas
    Posts
    3,787
    How long does it take to get a good tan in NH?
    I'm not tolerating Political Correctness anymore, from now on it's tell it like it is.

    Veto Pro Pak - The best tool bag you'll ever own






  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Bristol NH
    Posts
    229
    This summer not too long, but it won't last winter andheating season is coming fast

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    1,288
    No, that is not too much equipment for one guy to take care of. Once you get all the problems sorted out you will be sitting around waiting for something to break.

    Set up a PM program so that you are putting eyes and ears on the units on a regular basis that way there are fewer surprises.

    To contrast your situation and make a point just consider what I and other folks put up with in the way of work load.

    I am responsible for 57 buildings ranging is size from small fiber optic repeater huts to 7 story Central offices filled with telco gear. I have 6 chillers, 11 Liebert units, 6 cooling towers, 13 large pack units, too many large split systems to even know how many there are the smallest is 5 ton, hundreds of ceiling panel heaters, dozens of electric ducted heaters, 35 B&G pumps, two plate heat exchangers, dozens of airhandlers some big enough to have full sized stand up entry doors, hundreds of actuators, many VFD's, I have OA filters, return filter, supply filter ranging from 2 to 12 " thick, etc..., etc... You get the picture.

    To top it all off my area is L shaped. The closest buildint to me is 100 yards. The farthest is a 300 mile round trip. Average driving per day is about 150 miles.

    Get a white board and list everything you need to do and then prioritize it. The bossmans unit gets fixed first That is unless you work keeping telco equpment cool. The equipment always takes priority. Or motto at CRE is,"we don't care about people"
    Signature on hold. Trying to find a real Jefferson quote I like. Others here have bogus Jefferson quotes too.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Bristol NH
    Posts
    229
    yes wgrr thta sound like my situation, I never mentioned all the process units and cooling towera as well as the 2 3 million btuh cleaver brooks and the 6.5 acres of piping and steam traps that go with them but at least they are mostly under the same roof. I have started a pm routine but this summer have pretty much put fires out but when they go down I have go right through it. Thanks for the input, glad to see there might be light at the end of the tunnel

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Peoria IL
    Posts
    72
    i had 27 loctions more rtus than i can count just start a pm program keep track of repairs by unit build up a parts inventory so you dont have to run after every little part, belt or filter use good use of your time work smarter not harder i used a laptop with pdf files for every unit i had. old units are hard to find files for but it makes life so much better when you have install, parts and elec info that you can read instead of faded door pannel thats missing half of the info good luck hope you get paid by the hour

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    7,326
    15 mins a ton, give or take. you should be fine once you catch up.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    East Coast FL
    Posts
    1,065
    wgrr - i must say , there is no way one man can take of all you have listed properly. really?

    that would be ridiculous if there were no drive time , not to mention 150 average miles per day.

    a sleepless android working around the clock still a no go.

    i find that the whole industry and life nowadays does not give any where near adequate time to maintain equipment the right way.

    one of my favorite lines in this business is :

    air conditioning work takes time.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    NW Arkansas
    Posts
    1,288
    Quote Originally Posted by AiResearch View Post
    wgrr - i must say , there is no way one man can take of all you have listed properly. really?

    that would be ridiculous if there were no drive time , not to mention 150 average miles per day.

    a sleepless android working around the clock still a no go.

    i find that the whole industry and life nowadays does not give any where near adequate time to maintain equipment the right way.

    one of my favorite lines in this business is :

    air conditioning work takes time.
    90% of my systems have redundant back up units. Same for the pumps. I get a list of routines at the first of each month. I usually finish them up by the 17th of the month. Then I start repairing units on the list I keep prioritized by importance of the units function. My driving is all pretty much very nice newer interstate highways. Most of my work is between the two largest cities that are about 135 miles round trip. This Summer has been very busy because we saw temps 15 to 20 degrees higher than normal. There were a few 70 hour weeks.

    I work full time on the equipment and routines. I am not constrained by dealing with customers, pricing invoices, and other routine commercial tech obligations. I fill out a report for each job and I do that in my truck, on the job, with a computer. I make my own schedule and can work anytime of the day or night I want to. If a building is not on the routine list it does not get looked at unless a 911 alarm comes in. That keeps the load down to 10 to 15 buildings a month. I never have to routine a full building if it has more than two units in it. The work is broken up into, say condensers one month and the air handlers the next month. I will walk the whole building while I am there to check for obvious problems. Cost of repairs is not an issue as long as it is below a certain dollar amount.

    I have finally seen what regular maintenance can do. there are huge benifits to getting to know the equipment you work on. I never walk into a situation were the equipment has been ignored until it breaks down and needs a ton of repairs that the owners wants done for nothing ASAP. It is a good system that works. Many weeks I only work 4 10's and take a three day weekend.
    Signature on hold. Trying to find a real Jefferson quote I like. Others here have bogus Jefferson quotes too.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    East Coast FL
    Posts
    1,065
    wgrr - interesting. perhaps your situation is not what i had thought.

    you and i may have worked together before.

    i have a feeling.

    ever been to greenwood , mississippi?

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