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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    10

    2.5 Ton Heat Pump 5/8 line

    Hi everyone. I currently have a Bryant 2.5 Ton Heat Pump system that was installed back in 1995. I'm currently getting quotes for a new system and the Trane Dealer noticed that I currently have a 5/8 inch copper line and the Trane specs call for 3/4" line.

    What I wanted to know if does Lennox, Bryant, or anyone else use 5/8" line? I'm getting some other quotes and pulling new lines is going to be difficult based on the location of the indoor unit.

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    352
    I think all manufacturers are using 3/4 X 3/8 for 2.5 ton systems now (may be wrong on that, but I know that most are at least). Rheem/Ruud does allow for a 5/8 X 3/8 with line set length limitations. You will sacrifice a little efficiency as the compressor works a little harder to pull the needed amount of refrigerant through a smaller suction line, but it will not prevent the system from working properly. As a Rheem/Ruud dealer I know that our local distributor has a program where the contractor provides the system specs, the line set size, and approximate length and they plug those variables into the program and it will give you the adjusted efficiency ratings. Hope this helps!

    If you are trying to re-use the line set to manage costs I think this is a reasonable goal given the information you have provided.
    It's not rocket-science...

    It's electromechanical thermodynamic engineering

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    10

    response

    To respond one of my concerns is the cost. The quotes for flushing the existing line was quite a bit different from running new lines. The first contractor didn't mention anything about the line sizes and the 2nd said they would have to replace the lines. So I thought I should ask. Also some drywall work would have to be done to pull the lines. Which will add even more to the cost that was not part of the quote.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    NW Florida
    Posts
    707
    Quote Originally Posted by trox View Post
    To respond one of my concerns is the cost. The quotes for flushing the existing line was quite a bit different from running new lines. The first contractor didn't mention anything about the line sizes and the 2nd said they would have to replace the lines. So I thought I should ask. Also some drywall work would have to be done to pull the lines. Which will add even more to the cost that was not part of the quote.
    I always prefer to replace linesets if possible. But in your case being with the lines being in the wall. Make sure a good flush with a deep vacuum afterward be done. As for unit selection. Check on wall of shame for Train units. Rheem is a decent unit for the money.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    10
    Thanks for the information so far. I had Bryant out today and they said to use the existing line set. He said with the short distance we are running, probably 30 feet, it shouldn't be an issue. He's one point was it's still working for over 15 years with this size of cabling, which seemed like a reasonable argument.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    517
    I would go with the contractor that actually NOTICED your lineset may be a problem. The guy that is detail oriented is the one to hire.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2000
    Location
    Indianapolis, IN, USA
    Posts
    34,179
    Rheem has always been flexible with small lines. 5/8" on a 2.5 ton 13 SEER pump is 100% capacity at 25' or 96% capacity at 50'.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    352
    Quote Originally Posted by dunkman View Post
    I would go with the contractor that actually NOTICED your lineset may be a problem. The guy that is detail oriented is the one to hire.
    Unless the line set size isn't a problem... Then you have s a contractor bringing $$ problems into an equation when they aren't necessary. If Rheem says 5/8 to 25' at 100% efficiency, where is the issue?
    It's not rocket-science...

    It's electromechanical thermodynamic engineering

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    517
    Quote Originally Posted by HVACTechNC View Post
    Unless the line set size isn't a problem... Then you have s a contractor bringing $$ problems into an equation when they aren't necessary. If Rheem says 5/8 to 25' at 100% efficiency, where is the issue?
    True.

    I did not know any manufacturers that allowed 5/8" on anything over 2 tons.

    This reminds me of the time I came across a 4 ton Goodman heat pump on a 3/4" line. That thing screamed with harmonics even with the factory discharge muffler. Must have been a combination of high velocity at just the right length line. Put in a 7/8" and no more noise.

    I believe I have learned something today.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Metro Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    475
    Don't have the Trane specs for capacity loss for smaller linesets handy, but I do have the Carrier/Bryant ones. On most of the models I looked up you have a 1% capacity loss for lengths from 26-50 feet and a 2% loss from 51-80 feet. Anything over 80 ft isn't recommended without changing to a "long line" application. How long is the run from the condenser to the coil?

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    10
    I'm under 35 feet. I do agree that the Trane sales person was very detailed oriented. I'm not sure if that means the installers will be as well. I just hate the thought of having drywall repairs if the end result is the system will work with either line set.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    352
    I have installed systems with a 5/8" line on the suction side before, and if you are only going to lose 1-2% efficiency versus saving several hundred or a thousand dollars tearing up walls to replace the line set I would say to flush and re use them. Make sure to stress to the contractor that you want the line set thoroughly flushed, purged with nitrogen, and that all brazing connections be made with nitrogen trickling through the line set. If he does that, you will be fine, and have a great new system without tearing up your walls.
    It's not rocket-science...

    It's electromechanical thermodynamic engineering

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