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Thread: york r-114 comp

  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by felch_usn View Post
    thats the hard part, getting the help from the sub...they have no tech on board and the p.p.u. is out of service.so i have to take the liquid from the bottom of the receiver and put it in about 30 or so recovery bottles...so thats why i suggested the push-pull methood, but was told immediately that Ill break the comp, but I tried to tell them the comp. doesnt need to be running. but then again was told I know nothing about AC/R..so Ive been just researching around to see if my idea had any marret... and maybe get some backup next time I have any other questions..
    Push-pull has all kinds of merit, and is used on high and low pressure refrigerants, but this is what I perceive to be the crux of the matter in this case: either 1) Let them show you how to do it if they're the experts (whoever they are) or 2) If you don't have the experience to look at a system of this size and make a determination as to which is the best way to remove the refrigerant and how to do it, it would be wise to get someone that has the necessary experience to show you.

  2. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by superfittertech View Post
    uh did u ever work on R-114 it's also classified as a low pressure refrigerant although has higher pressures than R-11. USN changed to this from R-11 as centrifugal chillers would run about 0 psi on the low side instead of 15" of vacuum as vacuum leaks and moisture are the death of centrifugal chillers and on a Navy ship with all of the movement and expansion/contraction it was very hard to prevent vacuum leaks. On the high side R-114 would run about 30 psi verses about 8 psi for R-11. In 30+ years never have worked on a R-113 chiller, not saying they're not out there, just never seen one.
    no have not worked with R-114. just throwin that out there.

    thanks for the information.

    (then it is obviously a centrifugal , however my old roomate who served on a nuc sub informed me they use screw compressors for everything , refrigeration , air compression , due to space requirements , that is why i'm wondering what unit this is)

    (a navy ship and a navy sub are two different animals)

  3. #16
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    "They" are the subs personal maint. crew...i have faith in what i come up with and what i do, its just hard to tell an officer that, who says he's the grand wizzard of ac/r and no one knows more then him, and all us sniveling sh!ts wouldnt know what to do with out him. and that theres no dissagreeing. its very hard when no one has your back either, or to say hey maybe this idea would be best.

  4. #17
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    "Pride is a bigger obstacle to learning than stupidity."
    Thomas Szasz

    He got that right.
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  5. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by felch_usn View Post
    "They" are the subs personal maint. crew...i have faith in what i come up with and what i do, its just hard to tell an officer that, who says he's the grand wizzard of ac/r and no one knows more then him, and all us sniveling sh!ts wouldnt know what to do with out him. and that theres no dissagreeing. its very hard when no one has your back either, or to say hey maybe this idea would be best.
    Then I don't see what the problem is. Tell him to show you how he wants it done. If it works, great - the job was completed and you learned something new. If it doesn't, then be sure you did everything according to instruction so that you can't be accused of sabotage, and tell him it's not working. If he's the subject matter expert, let him make the decision. If he's responsible for the equipment and the outcome, he shouldn't have a problem with that arrangement.

  6. #19
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    .The Navy has a procedure for just about anything. If it involves a piece of equipment, then I would think it most definitely has procedures to be strictly followed, and to deviate from those procedures could lead to answering some difficult and uncomfortable questions. I saw careers affected by not following procedures. And we all have somebody to answer to. Even that officer who may be a jerk. I suggest you follow klove's advice. And if you want to get the procedures changed, it would probably be best to do so through your own chain of command. I'm curious felch, is the Frank Cable a tender? Oh yeah, and thank you for your service Petty Officer Felch.

  7. #20
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    sounds like a plan, if it breaks under his instruction its his ars...thanks. see my leaders are just a bunch of yes men and dont question things when need be.oh and the proceedure, they can not find it for some obscure reason... and the Frank Cable is a tender one of only two left,

  8. #21
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    oh and normaly we dont work on such equip. usually its billed out to York co. itself, at least thats what we did in the pit, so its odd that we would work on it. normally we just do small package ac's or work there lpad's, but ill chalk it up to extra exp. for the future

  9. #22
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    You are in over your head but since you are in the Navy use your recovery suck out of your tank (vapor) discharge (vapor shut condenser fan or water of on recovery equipment) from recovery into top of chiller push liquid out of bottom of chiller. Use a sight glass when liquid is done. Suck out of top into recovery machine turn on condenser fan or water for recovery to condense into recovery cylinder. Stop at 2 psi saturation 36 deg f let stand if pressure doesn't rise continue to remove vapor to 25" or whatever recovery will do

  10. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmyhat 597 View Post
    You are in over your head but since you are in the Navy use your recovery suck out of your tank (vapor) discharge (vapor shut condenser fan or water of on recovery equipment) from recovery into top of chiller push liquid out of bottom of chiller. Use a sight glass when liquid is done. Suck out of top into recovery machine turn on condenser fan or water for recovery to condense into recovery cylinder. Stop at 2 psi saturation 36 deg f let stand if pressure doesn't rise continue to remove vapor to 25" or whatever recovery will do
    Giving technical advice on the specifics of how to accomplish a task to someone that you feel like is in over their head probably isn't very sound judgment.

    And if someone is in over their head, what difference does it make that they're in the navy? You wouldn't do the same thing for a civilian having a problem?
    Last edited by klove; 08-31-2011 at 08:36 PM.

  11. #24
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    no offense, but everyone in the navy is in over their head... that's why there are VERY specific procedures for everything, especially in a nuclear engine room. If the crew can't find the procedures, get a copy of them from elsewhere. They DO exist.

  12. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by CraziFuzzy View Post
    no offense, but everyone in the navy is in over their head... that's why there are VERY specific procedures for everything, especially in a nuclear engine room. If the crew can't find the procedures, get a copy of them from elsewhere. They DO exist.
    I hope you were in the navy so that you'll have some defense against the onslaught that may possibly come your way for this statement. Lots of folks on this site were in the navy, and I'm pretty sure some folks are gonna take exception to your opinion. I was in the army, and I take exception to your opinion. Unless, of course, you're speaking of literally being in over your head 'cause you're underwater if you serve on a sub.........

  13. #26
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    I know of what i speak. Compared to the techs here, those working on the navy chillers have FAR less experience (if any). Those R-114 units may get pumped down once every few years for some repair, and the crew turnover is about the same. There are plenty of nuke mechanics that have never pumped one down, simply because the need hadn't arisen while they were on the ship. When I say they are in over thier head, it is not to say they are not capable of doing the work, or learning to do the work (It's my believe that anyone who made it though the nuclear training pipeline can learn ANYTHING). But if the opportunity never comes up to learn it, then they don't know it. THAT is why there are procedures. That is why they should be followed.

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