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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    389

    what to do with furnace outdoor intake and exhaust

    Hi,
    Have a hi-eff gas Carrier with the intake and exhaust outside the house. Am preparing for Irene in the Philadelphia area. Should I cover the 2 openings to prevent water entering them???Thanks
    George

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Northern VA 38 degrees N by 76 degrees W
    Posts
    5,060
    There should be no need to cover them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    They have drains since they are designed for condensate. If you get enough horizontal rain to to flood the unit... you will probably will have much, much much bigger water damage problems throughout your home.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Wake Forest, NC
    Posts
    352
    Plugging or blocking combustion air openings and exhaust gas flue piping is pretty much a bad idea all the way around...

    The only time I would recommend that is: Never.
    It's not rocket-science...

    It's electromechanical thermodynamic engineering

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    92
    Most major news networks are concerned about the dangers that Hurricane Irene poses to large cities in the North East. In fact, CNN has posted a story about how New York, Philadelphia and New Jersey are halting transit services because of the storm. I think they've forgotten that the South is going to brave the brunt of the hurricane. No matter, because here in Hurricane Country it's business as usual. To our neighbors up North: good luck with a few sprinkles and the occasional strong breeze. Pussies.

    -J. Mitchell

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    5,086
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    They have drains since they are designed for condensate. If you get enough horizontal rain to to flood the unit... you will probably will have much, much much bigger water damage problems throughout your home.
    Not on combustion air, other than rheem they don't.
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    389

    reply

    Thanks everyone. We'll be thinking of the South the next time you guys shut down because of flurries in the forecast. LOL.
    Thanks, again!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Keokuk, IA
    Posts
    5,520
    Quote Originally Posted by hvacvegas View Post
    Not on combustion air, other than rheem they don't.
    Sorry, on the inlet that would be correct, but those are usually pointed downward or horizontal parallel to the side of the house. Not too much concern with rain getting in.

    Either way, wouldn't that waer still end up in a place where it could drain, or would it collect in the sealed combustion area or the primary heat exchanger. it seems like they would still have a drain there as well since it's sealed and could end up with condensation.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    5,086
    Quote Originally Posted by motoguy128 View Post
    Sorry, on the inlet that would be correct, but those are usually pointed downward or horizontal parallel to the side of the house. Not too much concern with rain getting in.
    I wouldn't be concerned with regular rain either. In a huricane though....I dunno.
    Either way, wouldn't that waer still end up in a place where it could drain, or would it collect in the sealed combustion area or the primary heat exchanger. it seems like they would still have a drain there as well since it's sealed and could end up with condensation.
    Yep, it could drain right on the many electronics in a burner compartment, or possibly drain on a board. Or it could drain out of the furnace, and up the drywall of a furance closet. There is no drain inside a furnace, other than sealed tubing going directly to the secondary.
    Water in the combustion air is not good.
    Usually, it would be hard to imagine an ammount of water in the combustion air that would cause real damage in the furnace.

    If a 90 is horizontal the home during a huricane, I bet water will get in there.


    All in all, I wouldn't suggest bagging any of the pipes. Mostly because I would be afraid of someone forgetting to remove them.

    Anyone wanna guess what % of homeowners who use AC covers forget to take them off?

    Interestinly enough, I wonder how the burners on a downflow would act if they were submerged....
    "Better tell the sandman to stay away, because we're gonna be workin on this one all night."

    "Dude, you need more than 2 wires to a condenser to run a 2 stage heatpump."

    "Just get it done son."

    Dad adjusted

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    71
    What about one of these for the intake (if not bent over 90-degrees) and/or exhaust?

    http://savepipey.net/

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