Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 27 to 34 of 34
  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    Quote Originally Posted by PapaBliss View Post
    Thanks for the feedback Lynn. From reading the forum comments it seemed to me that oversizing was worst than undersizing .. or did I misread?
    Both are bad, but undersizing is rare.
    When a home is between sizes, most contractors go up in size. Going down in size is usually the better choice because of better dehmidification. See: http://arkansasenergy.org/business_d...t%20Better.pdf
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  2. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    15
    Here is the reply from the 1.5T proposal company.

    The load calculation called for 18,500 btu's. A ton and a half unit puts out 18,000 btu's. A 2 ton puts out 24,000 btu's. This software is set up for an average high of 90 degrees for summer time load. The two ton system would benefit if we had temperatures of 95 or higher. I can always re program the fan speed to back down the blower out put capacity on the two ton system to avoid short cycling on lower summer time out door temperatures.

    weather.com has daily summer highs in the 82 - 88 range.

    We also plan on replacing the 25 year old single pane + storms with double pane low e windows in the near future.

    So do we go with the 1.5T or bump up to the 2T ?

  3. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    Quote Originally Posted by PapaBliss View Post
    So do we go with the 1.5T or bump up to the 2T ?
    ..."seems nobody likes the XL16i" from post 1. If you choose the XL16i you would have the best sizing choice. It would operate about 80% at low capacity and deliver superior comfort. Remember what I said in post 25 about first floor heat rising to the top floor. I would probably do 2 ton on the top floor and 1.5 ton on the bottom if I were doing a single capacity system like the XL15i.

    Your dealers are focused on price for SEER and the XL15i wins.
    Add comfort and operational economy and the XL16i wins.
    Even better is the XL20i at about a 50% premium over the XL15i.
    This is a 15 to 20 year investment. Figure the premium cost at 18 cents a day per thousand dollars of difference. The price of a cup of coffee per day invested in your HVAC can buy a lot of comfort. If price is so important, don't have an air conditioner. If you only upgrade one system, do the top floor.
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  4. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Portland OR
    Posts
    1,845
    Quote Originally Posted by PapaBliss View Post

    So do we go with the 1.5T or bump up to the 2T ?
    I have to agree with Lynn, it sounds like this is a perfect situation for an XL16i or XL20i unit, you get the 2 ton so you are sure it has all the needed capacity and you get a unit that runs at 1.4 tons of capacity in 1st stage(60% of compressor capacity) The XL20i has a 1 ton and a 2 ton compressor and will give the best overall comfort, the longest overall life and is the quietest but can cost a bit more. With tranes instand rebate of $1,000 on a XL20i system it brings it a bit closer to the price of an XL16i.
    Check out my YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/skyheating1 We have customer testimonials, product reviews and more!
    Like us on FACEBOOK if you like our advice here!

  5. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    15
    Quote Originally Posted by lynn comstock View Post
    I would probably do 2 ton on the top floor and 1.5 ton on the bottom if I were doing a single capacity system like the XL15i.
    I know sf isn't the only factor but top floor = 900sf and bottom = 1500sf. Does that change anyone's opinion ?

    Thanks for all the feedback.

    P.S For my own sanity I think I just will move to a colder climate.

  6. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Portland OR
    Posts
    1,845
    Quote Originally Posted by PapaBliss View Post
    P.S For my own sanity I think I just will move to a colder climate.
    Or hawaii, no heating or cooling just open windows and amazing beaches...

    But as for the sq footage, often times we will put in a unit that is slightly larger per sq foot for the upstairs if it is a two system house just because of the natural heat rise and all the heat infiltration to ductwork going through a 140 degree attic.

    If its a single furnace system we oversize the ductwork for the upstairs and add a damper so that if they add AC they have the CFM needed to cool the upstairs but a damper to slow the heat and redirect it to the downstairs.
    Check out my YouTube channel - http://www.youtube.com/user/skyheating1 We have customer testimonials, product reviews and more!
    Like us on FACEBOOK if you like our advice here!

  7. #33
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    Yuma, AZ
    Posts
    2,361
    The top floor has 900 sq. ft. of attic and the bottom has only 600 sq. ft. of attic. The cooling load heat that comes up the stairwell is added to the top floor and subtracted from the bottom floor. I stick with my recommendation.

    "I would probably do 2 ton on the top floor and 1.5 ton on the bottom if I were doing a single capacity system like the XL15i."
    "I have never let my schooling interfere with my education."
    Mark Twain
    More at: http://www.quotationspage.com/subjects/education/

  8. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    15
    Thanks everyone.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Comfortech Show Promo Image

Related Forums

Plumbing Talks | Contractor Magazine
Forums | Electrical Construction & Maintenance (EC&M) Magazine
Comfortech365 Virtual Event