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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2
    Hi,
    I bought a house in the cleveland, OH area built in '54. I am considering replacing my furnace, but don't know where to start. I would like to find out some information on the current furnace first, but I cannot locate any info. What I have is a sears (105K BTU??) natural gas furnace. Model #867.762331 serial #H44374855 manuf #SUGF105c602. Any place I can find this information? I do not know if it is original to the house or not. It still works, but my gas bill is huge. Thanks for your help.
    Joel

  2. #2
    Hi Joel,

    I can't help you out on the age or efficiency of your furnace. I'm sure someone will be along shortly who can help you with that. But I will make some recommendations to help point you in a more informed direction.

    Call some local contractors and explain your situation to them, just as you have to us, and when you get a pleasant response from someone on the phone - I would consider giving that company the opportunity to come out and give you a free quote. Get several local companies to come out and give you free quotes. When they come out, be prepared to have a conversation not only about heating, but about your air conditioning as well. There is a good chance that your air conditioning may be old as well (if you have AC at this time). And due to several changes in our field of expertise it may be a viable option for you to consider replacing it at the same time as well. Furnaces and AC's are not just about heating and cooling anymore. They are about total climate control. You may want to consider add-ons such as air cleaners, whole-house humidifiers, or even ultra-voilet lamps for your ductwork. Some of these "options" can increase the efficiency, longevity, and comfort of your new investment. Also, some furnaces are actually more comfortable than others, with options like low-fire/high-fire and variable speed blower motors for better temperature control and circulation.

    Nowadays Joel, pretty much all brands are made (manufactured) the same. Be it Carrier, Trane, Lennox, Goodman, etc. they are all made out of sheet metal, and motors, and controls. What is of the utmost importance is that your system is installed properly, professionally, and to code and manufacturer specifications. I have personally seen a Carrier furnace destroyed in four years because a customer went with the "cheaper" contractor who cut corners and I have also seen them in service at close to thirty years. So get in the mindframe that purchasing your new "heating and cooling system" is not about brand. It is about craftsmanship and professionalism. Also make sure to choose a contractor that you feel comfortable with, because they will be the one who is performing the annual maintenance, and the one who honors the warranty if you ever have a problem. Do you want to put your twenty year investment into the hands of a fly-by-night to save a couple of hundred? Probably not. So keep that in mind. Remember, this system will be controlling the heating, cooling, humidity, dehumidity, circulation, air cleanliness, and many other factors that create an indoor environment for you and your family to live in.

    Do some digging. Find out which local companies come with high regards. Invite them to your home to have a discussion about upgrading your hvac (heating-ventilation-air conditioning) system and go from there.

    EDITED: Originally called the OP Bill, when his name was Joel. LOL

    [Edited by ryan_the_furnace_guy on 11-28-2005 at 06:05 AM]

  3. #3
    Nice reply Ryan...

    To the OP; the specifications on your old (existing) unit really don’t matter, if you’re looking at replacing it.

    The new system should be sized according to a Manual J.

    You can do a Manual J yourself by clicking here.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    SW FL
    Posts
    5,998

    Building Envelope

    Originally posted by joelpmc2
    Cleveland, OH area built in '54.

    I am considering replacing my furnace, but don't know where to start.

    What I have is a sears (105K BTU??) natural gas furnace.
    Determine insulation values, window properties and leakage.
    Improve building envelope.

    Furnace capacity needed could be decreased and
    ... in the 70,000 BTU 'range'.


    Designer Dan
    It's Not Rocket Science, But It is SCIENCE with "Some Art". ___ ___ K EEP I T S IMPLE & S INCERE

    Define the Building Envelope and Perform a Detailed Load Calc: It's ALL About Windows and Make-up Air Requirements. Know Your Equipment Capabilities

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    2

    additional info

    I found out that the furnace was installed about 1987. Still not sure about replacing it. Both the furnace and AC still work, and I am not sure I would be pursuing the best investment. The windows are possible from 1954. What is the usual efficiency for the time (1987)? Thank you for the replies.
    Joel

  6. #6
    If your furnace has an opening in the front where you can look up into the chimney pipe, it is 60 or 70% efficient.

    If it has a metal chimney and a little motor connected directly to it inside the furnace cabinet, it is 80% efficient.

    If it has pvc vents that go out the side of the house, or rarely, through the roof, it is 90% efficient.

    Hope this helps now. New furnaces can go as high as 96-97% efficient (debatable). But the big gains are to be had in comfort and in electrical use from a DC blower motor.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    3,400

    Re: additional info

    Originally posted by joelpmc2
    I found out that the furnace was installed about 1987. Still not sure about replacing it. Both the furnace and AC still work, and I am not sure I would be pursuing the best investment. The windows are possible from 1954. What is the usual efficiency for the time (1987)? Thank you for the replies.
    Joel
    I looked your model up on Sears parts site http://www3.sears.com/

    It has a draft induction motor, but no secondary heat exchanger.
    That puts it into the "nominal" 80% category.
    It is probably closer to an actual 78%, or so.

    It looks identical to a Whirlpool/Tempstar furnace I have in my shop.

    Be sure to get it serviced every year if you decide to keep it.

    It is nearing the end of its useful life.


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